The Voice: Launching a Star is Not the Main Goal

Original The Voice coaches, Adam Levine, Christina Aguilera and Cee Lo Green, plus host/producer, Carson Daly fielded questions from reporters Saturday at the Television Critics Association Press tour in Beverly Hills.

Reportedly, one of the first questions asked had to do with the inability of the show to launch a successful alum. That seemed to make the panel a little bit defensive!

The response didn’t deviate from what has been the show’s party line–that it would be nice to have a star that they can call their very own, but it doesn’t matter. And what’s more, it’s not even the aim of the show! Well, no kidding. It’s difficult for the contestants to pull the necessary focus that would allow them to attract a rabid fan base when the show revolves around the chemistry of the star-studded panel. 

Here’s what Adam Levine had to say about the lack of post The Voice success:

“I think it would be really nice to launch a huge star. A lot of things have to happen in order for that to take place. I think the goal of the show is to do what we can do for these amazing singers while they’re on the show … I think that we all know that the lightning in a bottle you have to capture to be successful in this business is extraordinary difficult. I’m not sure that that is the overall mission statement of the show. I think it would be really amazing if that happened. Because it hasn’t happened yet doesn’t seem like a shortcoming of the show, it just seems like something that hasn’t happened yet. I would love that, we would all love that.

Depending on how you define success, there’s been a lot of success from people who’ve been on this show”

In that last statement, Adam sounds like a stan after their special snowflake’s career failed to take off. Heh.

“We totally understand because of the comparisons that might exist out there, why it might seem to be a failure on the show’s part. The immediacy of winning and becoming a huge star is a fairytale that we would love to see take place, but it’s still a fairytale.”

Producer and host, Carson Daly added:

It’s not the main goal [producing a star] Jumping in here from the producing standpoint, there’s winners on this show everyday … You’ve got four of the biggest names in music that are offering experience. This is an experience. Even for contestants who come on and want to make it in the business and they don’t get a chair turned, one of these guys says something … That little nugget of advice — they leave our show feeling like they won.

If a contestant leaves the show feeling like a winner. WELL THEN I GUESS THEY WON! GOLD STARS FOR EVERYBODY.

If Big Machine Records chief,  Scott Borchetta, works his magic, and cycle 4 winner, Danielle Bradbery becomes a big country star–her success would certainly become the centerpiece of the following season’s promo.  Carson Daly would never say, “Yeah, Danielle is a huge success, but that’s beside the point of The Voice…next!”

Just the egos of the coaches alone probably have them dying to be the one responsible for launching a star.  Adam and Carson’s remarks sound like so much rationalization for what really is a shortcoming built into the structure (coach-centric) of the show.

Other tidbits from the panel include:

  • About his “I hate this country” gaffe, from a May episode Adam Levine said, “It’s part of my personality to say things that piss people off.” and “”Everyone makes mistakes. If your intentions are good and someone misunderstands you, regardless of what the scenario is, I think people can see through stupid media hype. No offense.”
  • Christina Aguilera on taking a break from The Voice, “I needed a moment to step away.  Thank god for Shakira. She did a beautiful job.”
  • On Usher taking his place for season 4, Cee Lo Green said, “It was awkward and intriguing at the same time. It was a bit of an out-of-body experience.”

Via The Hollywood Reporter, Zap2it, EOnline

  • ladymctech

    I guess I give them points for honesty. The reason I haven’t been able to switch over to this show from Idol is that I never feel vested in any of the contestants the way I do with AI, even when AI is having a “bad season.” In fact, that probably makes me more determined to support whoever I like that year.

  • James

    They would all being singing a different tune if they had produced a star out of any season up to this point.

  • cerise

    The real goal is to re-launch their own careers.

  • kikileo

    The format doesn’t allow people to get invested in a contestant, thus the low sales. The judges are the stars of the show, not the contestants. Ask most people and their all time favorite reality show contestant probably comes from Idol.

  • MissMyEm

    I kind of do see where they are coming from though. Success means different things to diffferent people. While reality winners like Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood have enjoyed super success, there are plenty of others who are successful and happy even though they may not be household names. Tony Lucca just completed an EP. Would he have been able to do that had he not been on The Voice? Who’s to say how successful he’ll be, but he’s happy doing what he does. And whereas some might not think Jason Castro or Constantine Maroulis are successful in the “major star” sense of the word, both are enjoying success in the career of their choice. Sometimes the people who the judges pick or the producers pick to be stars, don’t always work…like in the case of Pia and Dia (Blake’s choice from The Voice), whereas someone else might be successful because they’ve worked at it who wasn’t a favorite. Jennifer Hudson comes to mind.

    So bottom line is I can see where Adam Levine is coming from. The music industry is not an easy egg to crack…especially for certain genres of music. But those who do come off shows like The Voice, given the opportunity to tour and bring in decent crowds might consider themselves successful. It all depends on whether one defines success as Michael Jackson or Matt Kearny.

  • Incipit

    Yes. When this show first came on – I thought the Chairs were fun, but after that, it wasn’t set up to encourage a connection with any contestants. I couldn’t even keep track of all of them. I realized, I was supposed to be following the judges; marveling at their strategy, or lack of it – agreeing or disagreeing with ‘their’ song choices, and rooting for one of the ‘judges’ to win.

    The contestants were just game pieces…and I quickly lost interest. That hasn’t changed. IMO.

  • Liteasy

    Adam and Blake don’t need to re-launch their own careers. They’re both doing extremely well.

    The judges on Idol are there to re-launch their own careers.

  • ScreamWGWG

    Main goal of The Voice should be… get rid of Christina Milian.

  • Anny_nanny

    Apparently this means that the TV already removed the last two winners on a shelf to the first two.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    Tony Lucca just completed an EP. Would he have been able to do that had he not been on The Voice?

    Well, Lucca had released 6 prior EPs, as well as 8 studio albums and a live album, so… maybe yes? He was hanging out with JC Chasez of ‘N Sync in the mid-00s, who executive co-produced at least one of those albums.

    The thing with the first two seasons of The Voice isn’t that people didn’t become household names. It’s that so many who placed high didn’t noticeably forward their careers compared to their prior major-label contracts, prior contracts as part of a band, or prior indie releases. Vicci Martinez may be better off, but of the first two seasons, she’s the only one I’d point to with any confidence.

    It seems possible that the show is turning this around with Cassadee Pope and with Danielle Bradbery. I’d actually like to see that happen.

  • yaddabing

    their careers were nowhere near where they are now before they joined the voice though

  • SteelWauhterz

    That’s not quite an accurate reading from last season. Mariah is a legend that can pretty much do what she chooses. Nikki’s career has been on the ascent for the past few years, and it seems as if Keith was in no slump either.

  • cerise

    Blake wasn’t a consistent country hitmaker and Entertainer of the Year winner until AFTER joining The Voice. And I believe Maroon 5 popularity shot up after The Voice as well. Christina…. she’s still trying.

  • Dej

    Nashville Republic seems to be putting in quite a lot of effort with Cassadee. Her music video was very well done. Its nearly impossible to launch a Kelly Clarkson or Carrie Underwood with these shows nowadays because the novelty is gone but I think Cassadee and Danielle, especially if she stays country, can have success.

  • Lala3

    This is reason I never got behind The Voice. The idea for these shows was to recognize and find new talent, not to bolster their own careers…or that is what I thought the show was really about at the beginning.

  • Lala3

    This is reason I never got behind The Voice. The idea for these shows was to recognize and find new talent, not to bolster their own careers…or that is what I thought the show was really about at the beginning.

  • ellen8

    I watch the Voice to be entertained at that moment – not to find another reason to buy cd’s !! After each season, I look forward to the next, and actually forget about the past season’s contestants.

    I enjoy the parts of the show when we get to watch the mentoring and bonding between the contestants and coaches. This is the one show where the coaches actually seem to care about the contestants. That is the big appeal for me.

    If a star is born, so be it, but I could really care less. It’s just an hour of entertainment each night it’s on the air – that’s all.

  • Not fit to print

    The biggest obstacle to launching a star is The Voice’s back-to-back runs. Two winners a year means neither of them gets a proper media launch. A few months in the spotlight and the show pretty much grabs it back for its’ new season.

  • girlygirl

    While Adam and Blake were successful, neither one was anywhere near as successful before coming on The Voice as they are currently. M5 was starting to fade away a bit (Moves Like Jagger is the song that re-launched them) and Blake was selling moderately and was not winning country music awards left and right like he is now.

  • girlygirl

    Tony Lucca had put out multiple albums and was actually fairly well known in the indie music world before he came on The Voice, touring all over the country, etc. The guy had around 500,000 followers on twitter before he ever appeared on the show — he definitely was not an unknown musician.

  • girlygirl

    Chris Mann may be another one who is much better off since going on the show. He seems to have made a nice niche for himself in the AC world.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    Blah, blah, blah….so much rationalization. The Voice would LOVE to have even a moderate commercially successful contestant, let alone a “huge” star.

  • Lake

    Danielle Bradbery didn’t even come close to Cassadee’s sales, despite releasing a single a mere month after winning.

    She’s not the next star.

  • Lori

    The Voice is not American Idol, thankfully. Who needs just another Idol clone (I’m looking at you X Factor). I totally enjoy the chemistry between The Voice celebrities. I really like that they are first and foremost Mentors, not judges. I think contestants going through The Voice probably get more out of their experience in terms of learning the business than most of the Idol contestants. And many of the contestants have retained relationships with their Mentors. Idol doesn’t come close to providing that kind of intangible reward for contestants, let alone winners. There is room for both shows, with their different primary focuses and that’s alright with me ;)

  • Karen C

    I think you’re right about this. I haven’t felt the connection I do with contestants from other shows, and I think that is why. The focus is on the judges, and not so much on the contestants.

  • Not fit to print

    This is true. Totally different approach. I watched the finale for Cher and ended up loving the judges. Not sure about Cee Lo and Christina but Usher and Shakira – yes. I just might tune in.

  • Kirsten

    If launching a star is not the main goal, what is? Sounds like the main goal is to get nuggets of experience from the stars? So, people should buy 10 copies of a song on iTunes to get their favourite to the next round so that the judges can gush at how good they are and sift through the comments for nuggets? Why vote at all during the last round because the nugget train is at the end of the road?

    Sounds like some goal posts are moving here compared to the press two years ago when the show started.

    “We totally understand because of the comparisons that might exist out there, why it might seem to be a failure on the show’s part. The immediacy of winning and becoming a huge star is a fairytale that we would love to see take place, but it’s still a fairytale.”

    I guess Idol and X-Factor UK are like Disneyland – they are the places where Fairytales come true. Just ask One Direction, Kelly and Carrie. At this point, I think even moderate success would be nice from the Voice. A top ten song and a platinum Certification maybe? Most years of Idol canachieve that.

  • nncw

    I am an avid watcher of both The Voice and AI – they put on a good production. They both seem to garner a (rabid) fan base for certain singers during their shows – which I think tells you they are doing something right since it is a contest. AI has been criticized recently for the panel of judges and of course last year’s “girls are in it to win it” mentality but even then I thought it was worth watching every show (even though I swore I wouldn’t at times). The X Factor – I watch very sporadically – I find the production to be heavy handed – something about it takes away from my being able to enjoy the singers. The only thing I think is okay about it is how Simon takes the best “losers” and has them join a group which then seems to be more successful post show than the actual winner, I actually thought that would have worked well for the AI girls who were eliminated after the top 20 2013. From American Idol I really like Kris Allen and from The Voice I liked Dia Frampton – enough to buy their cds whenever they put something out. One tidbit that might bring the wrath of mj bloggers: It is interesting that Phillip Phillips is a “success” and Lee Dewyze was not. Lee’s recent songs have a little of the vibe that Phillip has in his Home song – is it possible if Lee’s coronation song was Home it would have helped his career? (although I think Phillip Phillips does have more of a soulful spirit in his singing.
    I concur with Adam – it is hard to control the journey these musicians will take – very Zen!

  • tripp_ncwy

    Idol (labels) just just provides the tangibles such as gold/platinum singles and albums, radio play and actual support once off the show. Even the less successful alums have sales far exceeding what has been resulted from TV alums.

  • Lori

    LOL. I’ve tried to reply twice but you’ve changed your post twice while I was replying… Okay, so based on your 3rd version… Idol doesn’t provide gold/platinum singles or radio play. Idol provides a platform. The rest is a crapshoot. P2 won that crapshoot and is one of a few Idols that radio will play these days. But that’s besides the whole point of my post anyway. My point is that the contestants get something out of The Voice that Idol doesn’t provide and that is the season-long mentoring by established recording artists. That is a great benefit that the other competitions don’t offer. The Voice would not be successful if it just cloned Idol. It chose a different focus and it seems that America for the most part likes the results. Otherwise it wouldn’t be beating Idol and X Factor in the ratings.

  • ladymctech

    IMO Chris has been the most successful alum so far.

  • ladymctech

    Agree about Tony pre-Voice, but has being on the show brought him a surge in sales or bookings?

  • Kirsten

    The Voice is successful because the judges are very entertaining and Mark knows how to produce an exciting show. Most people watch shows to be entertained so the show is wildly successful at its true Main Goal.

    What is the Fantasy is that the show is there to help the contestants. If the contestants get slightly better gigs or a few contacts, that is an unintended consequence that the show is happy occured, but would not be the least bit concerned if it did not.

    That is fine. A show does not have to be what it is not. And the contestants have had four seasons to learn what the Voice is about so they wold have to be as dumb as a box of hair to expect more.

    As a contestant, you may get on TV for several weeks, you will get to talk at least briefly with true stars, they may say something useful, you may get picked and get a few actual minutes with the star each week, you may get your name in the top ten on iTunes and you may get a contract. That may be enough for a lot of artists.

  • Sassycatz

    Well, this is assuming that Idol contestants get no or very little mentoring and that the people who do the mentoring are not worthy because they’re not the celebrity judges. We know, however, that they do get mentoring from the singing coaches, from the musicians, and even from the celebrity judges who make the effort, let alone — in the past — the invited guests. (This last season Connick did some of that.)

    As for The Voice, we’re assuming that the judges’ mentoring is superior to anything Idol offers and that, what is shown on air, is happening all the time *with the judges* and not with judges’ helpers … who for all intents and purposes are equivalent to Idol’s singing coaches.

  • Amy Beth

    That doesn’t explain Season 1 and 2 which were not back to back. Of course, those winners were 30+ years old.

    While everyone was talking about how Cassadee and now Danielle were female, I believe TPTB were more excited that they were young!

  • Amy Beth

    As far as I’m concerned, TV’s job is to put on an entertaining show and not harm the contestants’ careers. If they are in a better spot than before they appeared on the show, it’s all to the good.

    Ironically, it may be the mid-tier contestants who benefit the most from the exposure.

  • waitingforthe1

    Let’s be real – American Idol is not now nor has it ever truly been about launching a star. They got incredibly luck with Kelly in Season 1 and then again with Carrie in Season 4. it was through NO EFFORT on the part of the show itself though that those two became the stars they are.

    At least The Voice is up front with it. They don’t pretend to be in the business of making careers for these artists unlike Idol. I’d rather have them say up front that’s not their goal all while clearly the show is about the judges.

  • Dej

    Cassaddee got to sing her single in front of 15 million interested viewers on a primetime showing of The Voice and had a month long radio tour before her single was released. Danielle just started her radio tour and sang on a morning show with maybe 4 million viewers. It’s too early to tell for sure but I predict Danielles going to prove a lot of people on here wrong.

  • Larc

    Finding a big star was definitely the premise of the show when it started. Even the name The Voice connotes that. What they are saying now sounds a little like “sour grapes” for something they have been unable to do so far. Or maybe it’s just an honest admission the show actually never has been about what its name implies.

  • thirdtime

    This is so ridiculous – of course they would LOVE to have a star to brag about. But by saying it doesn’t matter to them if anyone becomes a star, because that’s not what the show is about just turned me off to The Voice even more. Could they at least admit it instead of saying things like it’s a fairytale and making it sound like there are winners on the show every day because just getting advice from their big ego judges is winning enough? Seriously, could they think any more highly of themselves?

  • milwlovesadam

    The main goal of these shows has become the judges getting a chance to pimp their own careers. It’s a four month advertisement for whatever crap they are going to perform and put out for the masses to buy.

    Poor contestants just get in the way.

    Too much over-production. Too much grand-standing. Too many little girls in high high heels with bad vocals. Just toooo much. I barely watch a full episode of anything anymore. I just skim through with my DVR. I listen to the voice for a second, I scan the visuals, yawn, and zzzzip to the next performer.

    Too many shows, too much production, too much ego.

    And very few true stars are born.

  • tripp_ncwy

    The judges are feeding the fairytale since I think all of them have been involved with certain Voice alums post-show in some fashion with limited results.

  • tomr

    The Voice overemphasizes the judges to the extent that I have grown to not like any of them, (Way too much arrogance for me.) Also trying out for Idol seems to be more up to the individual versus the impression that you have to be “invited” to be on The Voice. I am actually enjoying the judges on AGT and thus the show more than I have the other three shows (included XFactor) here.

  • dd999

    Thank you! I agree with you! I’ve listened to Cassadee sing her song ‘Wasted Tears’ which, by the way, is a well suited song choice for her, given her life story of abandonment by her father, as was her singing Blake’s song ‘Over You’. IMO there is no comparison as to who has the awesome country singing voice, its Danielle. Its been a while since I’ve heard a country duet sung as well as she did with Hunter Hayes and also the song she sang with Blake! I say, given some time, good songs, and good management Danielle is the total package!

  • milwlovesadam

    Agree. It has such a different vibe to it. All the judges are kinda geeks in one way or another, and the show has a little of the Ed Sullivan thing going on, where you can actually get on TV for doing odd acts. You don’t need to be a prom queen on stilettos and try to be a chart topper. The show has an element of surprise. And the judges never pimp themselves.

  • Flynn950

    I read somewhere that The Voice was just about the entertainment value. It’s more ‘game show’ where the four celebrities disguised as coaches complete to win with the last singer standing.

  • iani

    “At least The Voice is up front with it. They don’t pretend to be in the business of making careers for these artists unlike Idol.

    Why then TV US is so into having plant-artists almost every season? Wasn’t Cassadee asked twice to be part of the show, Angel Taylor for a try, back-up singers for well known artists, Tony Lucca as former mouseketeer? So, the reason TV has those semi professional/well known artists has been only to give a semi DWTS kind of feeling, keep up the show game interest through some known artists? It seems to me they really wanted the first seasons to have a big voice recognized by the music industry but the hope has faded away for different reasons and the entertainment factor has been brought as easier way to keep the interest on the show up.

  • girlygirl

    Anyone can try out for The Voice. You don’t have to be invited.

  • girlygirl

    The Voice commercials talk (or used to talk about, not sure if the current commercials do) about finding the next superstar. That was the whole original premise of the show, with the twist that it was the “voice” rather than a person’s looks or whether the contestant is the “whole package” that would be the reason a judge would turn around for them.

  • Lori

    Nope, that’s not assuming AI contestants get no mentoring. What I said was “season-long mentoring by established recording artists.” No knock on Michael Orland, Mrs. McPhee, Byrd or anyone else now or once associated with Idol. Season-long, established, and recording artists were the key words in my post. I love watching Idol when they have guest mentors, such as HCJr., who really does mentor, but still, it’s just for a single show. I think the contestants developing that mentor-mentee relationship for the duration of their time on the show is what sets it apart. As an example, two years later, Blake still supports Rae Lynn (even though I personally thought she was terrible!). Adam still supports Tony Lucca by signing him to his label and bringing him on tour. Cee-Lo released a single with season 1 Vicci Martinez. Those are some of the benefits of being mentored by season-long established recording artists.

  • Ralph

    Blake may not have won entertainer of the year before the voice but he was a consitent hit maker and sold well before the voice. The first single Blake ever had went to #1. He had 8 #1 songs and 4 gold albums prior to the Voice. Has the show helped his career, of course but he was fine before the show. As was Adam and Maroon 5.

  • Sassycatz

    And some of the Idol judges have developed relationships with former Idol contestants. One that stands out is Randy Jackson and Brooke White. I think he produced some of her music, for instance.

  • Incipit

    “What I said was “season-long mentoring by established recording artists.” – No knock on Michael Orland, Mrs. McPhee, Byrd or anyone else now or once associated with Idol.”

    Aww – yes it is a knock. IMO. It’s also Word Games. So TV contestants get mentoring from season long established recording artists. The Idol contestants get mentoring from season long established industry professionals, and more than one per contestant.

    The connections that carry on beyond their season last for both sets of people – just check Michael Orland’s twitter, for instance.

    Recording artist vs Industry professionals –
    It’s an artificial distinction, IMO. Proving What?

    Where do you look for the difference in results, in their performances, in their subsequent successful use of this advice, what?

    Bottom Line – The Voice is a different kind of show – the major success accrues to the judges, not to their playing pieces.

    JMO.

  • dd999

    I like The Voice and the turning of chairs, that way, it really is about the singing voice, after that there’s a whole lot more that the contestant has to display on stage, like stage presence and personality, and the right song choices. With AI I find it rather ironic, that when they allowed the chips to fall where they will, a star like Phillip Phillips was voted the winner (he’s the total package). This year I felt AI did some micro-managing, to have a girl win, and we have Candice, who has a beautiful voice, but is not the total package and so far seems to be struggling!

  • Lori

    I respect your opinion. And just to be clear, “I” made no assumption and your interpretation of what I said does not change what I actually said.

  • Incipit

    Of course it doesn’t change it, Lori – there are no assumptions in my post – an opinion and a lotta questions though, in an attempt to clarify what you consider to be the difference between TV contestants getting season long mentoring from established recording artists, and Idol contestants getting season long mentoring from established industry professionals, and more than one per contestant. That is what you pointed out.

    Inviting you to expand on where you see this difference that you brought up manifested in the careers of Voice contestants as opposed to Idol contestants is not an interpretation, it’s a question. ??

    The opinion that TV judges have a visible boost to ‘their’ careers that the cast does not is based on fact, not interpretation.

  • Kirsten

    It was Byrd that helped Jennifer Hudson get the role in Dreamgirls. While she and the others may not be household names, Idols can attest to learning a lot from the behind-the-scene mentors on Idol and they have helped Idols make valuable connections.

    There is more to being a good teacher than just being a star.

  • thedeviledadvocate

    The Voice’s main goal may not be to find a star, but it is way to early to say Cassadee and or Danielle will never be stars. Jermaine Paul and Javier Colon have not yet had great success, but TV is still a relatively new show. Even though they have now completed 4 seasons, their first winner was announced just over 2 years ago. I think Adam and Carson are saying TV’s main goal isn’t finding a star because they are sick of hearing that TV has yet to find a star. Should Cassadee or Danielle, or for that matter, Amanda Brown, Sasha Alexander, or Judith Hill end up being as successful as some of the Idol alumni (not named Carrie or Kelly) then TV will say, our main goal isn’t to find a star, but well, even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in awhile.

    Comparing AI to TV is like comparing AI to Star Search, or The Ed Sullivan Show. You can’t fairly compare them. ED launched Elvis and The Beatles and countless others. Star Search launched Alanis Morissette, Beyonce’, Christina Aguilera, Britney Spears, Usher, Leann Rimes, and Justin Timberlake. So, as successful as Idol has been, its alumni’s sales are small when compared to the alumni from Ed Sullivan and Star Search. Apples to Oranges people, just like AI to TV, apples to oranges.

    For me, I enjoy all these singing shows. However, I am an avid fan of only one alumni from Idol and one from the Voice. I will follow the careers of Haley Reinhart and Danielle Bradbery for as long as they continue in the music business. Of course, I like many of the other alumni, but I don’t buy their albums. I have purchased some of Carrie’s singles, and a few other singles from various alumni. I have purchased everything that Haley and Danielle have released.

    Big Machine likely has a totally different opinion than The Voice does about TV’s past two winners. Big Machine is absolutely looking for a star, and they are putting their money where their mouth is in promoting Cassadee and Danielle. For all we know right now, Cassadee and Danielle will turn into TV’s first and second (in no particular order), gold or platinum selling artists. The Voice may already have a couple of stars, even if that isn’t the main goal of their show.

  • taptap

    omg, the purpose of EVERY tv show is to get eyeballs on the tv screen.

    imo the difference between the two shows is that they draw different viewers. Those interested primarily in weekly tv entertainment choose TV, while those who need their taste and judgement validated through an obsession with an artist choose AI. The more their chosen AI artist fails, the more strident the obsessive fan becomes.

  • lkingcorn

    Well they are saying it how it is. I don’t believe the show professes to be anything but a springboard. Idol on the other hand does say they are star makers…big difference. Even idol contestants who don’t hit it big have more name recognition.

  • taptap

    eta: This is the strategy employed by AI now, imo. They have drawn and encouraged the fans who care more about ‘being right’ in their artist selection, therefore they stay invested in the show long after their special snowflake has disappeared off the radar. AI keeps its core fans, but the pool is shrinking, because an obsessive can only defend their failed and gone artists for so many seasons before they slink away. If their special snowflake becomes successful, they often lose interest in the show, unless they need to get new validation from a new season’s artist, in which case they stay tuned.

    AI super-fans’ support is more about themselves than the actual artist imo, which is why the viewer (and especially voter) base of AI is getting smaller and smaller. It also explains why so many super fans think AI mgmt. isn’t listening to them. They’re listening, but not to the small obsessive portion of the AI fans. Their are a whole lot of ‘tv is just entertainment fans’ watching tv, and they’re a lot easier to cater to.

    ‘American Idol’ doesn’t really have anything to do with America – it’s just a name.

  • thirdtime

    Of course the goal of any TV show is to get eyeballs on the TV screen, but there is no need for The Voice to pretend they wouldn’t love to have a big star to brag about. Everyone can see right through that, and that’s what is so ridiculous about these statements they made.

  • Montavilla

    Right. There are a lot of post-show connections that we know about. The Byrd/Dreamgirls thing is one. There’s also the Chris Medina single — which happened because a music producer connected to AI was inspired by Chris’s story.

    There are plenty of Idol-to-Idol connections that happened, Idols writing for other Idols, Idols touring together, Idols collaborating on shows and singles, even Idols falling in love and getting married.

    And there are the stories about how helpful Randy Jackson is post-show. He’s helped more than one alumni by hooking them up with producers or other musicians.

    That’s not to say the same thing isn’t happening on The Voice. They have coaches, and producers, and so on. Maybe we haven’t that much about it because there’s only been four seasons so far.

    But, I think that if I were looking at which show would give me the best industry credibility and connections (rather than which one is the “coolest” right now), I’d be looking hard at AI.

    It’s sort of like deciding which college you want to attend. Maybe one has more famous professors — but maybe another one has more connected professors in a given field.

  • taptap

    You say that as though it’s a given there’s anything to ‘see right through’. TV shows want viewers. If they get them, they’re successful. Occam’s razor is usually the right predictor, as opposed to conspiracy-theory superfans who think everyone’s out to manipulate them, and you must admit this is a good description for the AI superfan. I can’t count how many times people have said here that they a) sometimes change their artist preference based on judge manipulation, or b) harden their preference for an artist based on judge manipulation. Doesn’t say much for their actual musical preference imo. Which is why many argue that the preferences displayed by middle-american AI fans is so often bland – it’s less about the music and more about how they perceive themselves manipulated by the AI ‘man’.

    tl;dr Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

  • thirdtime

    I see what you mean, Idol fans are definitely over the top with their obsession sometimes and Idol does seem to attract more of those kind of viewers (and voters). However the “stars” that Idol has produced ended up being stars because they were accepted by the non-viewers as well – they aren’t stars just because of a rabid Idol fan base. So far The Voice has failed to produce anyone who has caught on with non-viewers.

  • surpriseleft

    The difference with Idol is that their winners disappear into obscurity 2-3 years down the line, instead of immediately after the show like with The Voice. Candice is admittedly changing that paradigm.

  • http://www.mjsbigblog.com/ mjsbigblog

    I don’t really see what the “AI Super Fan” has to do with this argument at all? Please stay on topic, rather than using the topic to diss AI stans.

  • taptap

    Most of the big stars came early in Idol’s season (Kelly, Carrie, Daughtry), when viewers didn’t have alternative choices. The success stories have gone down a lot since then, and those few that have made it during the second half of the seasons I count as true talent that quickly caught on outside the Idol bubble, whether it was in singing or some other entertainment arm (JHud, Adam, Phillips).

    I do think there are many other successful alums who are happy with the opportunities exposure on the show provided. For the most part these people are not known as ‘celebrities’ but they’re successful in their own way, nonetheless. I’d be willing to bet the same is (or will be) true of some of TV’s alums as well.

  • Mel432

    I thought The Voice and AI were similar in that the shows themselves, were for the purpose to entertain and, yes, to find the best singers out there. Isn’t it up to the contestants’ management after each season to promote whoever was signed? If Phillips hadn’t been promoted (he probably got the best promo of any winner AI ever had) as much as he had, would he be as successful as he is now?

  • ptebwwong

    Yes, every TV show wants viewers. However, at what point will not having a star hurt The Voice. Will talented people keep auditioning? Most people at least want some success.

    IMO if no winner of The Voice & XF at least has mediocre success, we will see the level of talent of declining.

  • Sassycatz

    Well, that song that he thought wasn’t him and disliked really helped. It was like lightening in a bottle. But, we’ll see how well he does with his own music.

  • Kirsten

    I’m sorry, but I have to pick a nit here. Ed Sullivan launched neither The Beatles nor Elvis. The Beatles already had the number one song on the Hot 100 two weeks before they appeared on the show. His audience was not filled with screaming young females because that was his usual audience, they were there to see their idols.

    Ed didn’t even want Elvis on the show and only agreed after rival shows made a killing in the ratings by having him on – including Steve Allen who actually beat Ed’s show with Elvis.

    While their appearances on the show demonstrated they had arrived, they were already deemed successes by that time.

    Ed was a follower, not a leader in these cases.

  • thirdtime

    Again, I agree you have a point. However Idol still has been able to produce better sellers with more radio play even in recent years, with Idol’s ratings falling, than the other singing competition shows. What is your theory on why that is? Better talent coming out of Idol? More promotion? Idol has a better reputation so radio still plays them more than the other shows? Phil Phillips (for example), can’t be selling just to his Idol fanbase anymore.

  • Sassycatz

    I think there will always be people who want to be on television, and they all think they’ll be *the one* who gets their big break through their time on the show, in spite of all those who preceded them and were less than successful.

  • Pat H

    I have a feeling that the extent of The Voice’s judges’ mentoring is exactly what we see on our TV screen. I really doubt they spend a lot of time with these kids. IDK, maybe I am just too jaded and skeptical!

  • taptap

    I think the reason TV doesn’t produce as many good sellers is because TV doesn’t do post-promotion like AI does. This seems patently true to me, and it is also exactly what TV is saying above. Their main objective is to make good weekly tv, which apparently they do, based on ratings, not to reinvest their profit on post-series promotions of contestants (like the AI tour, etc.). They provide the platform, and the artist has to do the heavy lifting afterwards.

  • Pat H

    Exactly!

  • Karen C

    What happens after does have more to do with the artist’s management. But I also think that the main difference between TV and Idol is that the Idols get an original single when they win, even the runners up usually get one. This gives them something to promote after the show, and in some cases, like with Home, TOML, A Moment LIke This, have become very successful.

    I do also think the audience gets more involved with Idol, because there are more voting rounds, so the audience is more dedicated to the artist when they do release something.

    So, I think it is management but in part, the audience involvement and having an original single released is part of why the Idols do better.

  • Matty Minkus

    The purpose of the show is to entertain. Based on ratings, I think it succeeds.

  • Pat H

    “Most years of Idol can achieve that.”
    I think Season 9 of Idol is the only season that did not have that happen at least once. In 4 seasons, the Voice has not even come close.

  • jpfan2

    Gone Gone Gone is the current single and it’s one he picked for his album. It went platinum and ditto for his album so he’s got more than Home going on. I do agree that having the songs he writes himself do well will be key.
    P2 is more than a one hit wonder who got great promo..

  • taptap

    I agree completely – everyone think’s they’ll be ‘the one’.

    But the truth is that there are only a small percent of artists that really are great. Those that are great and work hard, given either the AI or TV platform and exposure, may actually find that they’re ‘the one’.

    This is better, imo, than a whole pond full of mid-level artists who won’t appeal to the general public once the show ends. It separates the wheat from the chaff. I think this is a natural process, and a necessary one. The idea that Idol will always produce a big post-show winner is what makes some so disappointed in the seasons where that doesn’t happen.

  • thirdtime

    I have to admit that I don’t know that much about The Voice, I haven’t really been able to get interested in it. But I thought I saw things here that said The Voice was good about promoting after the show. Didn’t some of the judges even take people out on tour with them and help them get record deals? What is Idol doing differently to promote?

  • Sassycatz

    That’s what I was talking about Gone(3) wasn’t his song either. DC had two platinum hits — neither he wrote — so it’s been done. I’d just like to see if P2 can maintain this momentum with his own material.

  • taptap

    If he’s wise, he’ll continue to listen to the folks who understand why Home is a hit, while simultaneously working his own material into the mix. Once he has a large fanbase (which I think he already has) and if he doesn’t stray too far afield of what that fanbase likes, he’ll be able to do pretty much anything he wants (within reason, ofc). I don’t think this makes him a sell-out. It makes him a good artist and a sound businessman, and those two things together are a pretty good recipe for success.

  • Incipit

    “I have a feeling that the extent of The Voice’s judges’ mentoring is exactly what we see on our TV screen.”

    Pat H, I’m just as jaded and also cynical…it’s like the mentoring that Iovine hands out for the TV cameras, I think. The behind the scenes professionals have the one on one time…but on TV, they don’t get any of the credit.

    IMO.

  • taptap

    The biggest post-promotion of AI as far as I can see is the summer tour, which gives the idols a chance to gain new fans and expand their tv season’s base. They can also gain exposure to industry insiders who can observe their talent and assess their potential on a concert stage. That’s pretty big. But as we’ve seen, when a season doesn’t produce a stand-out artist, the tours end up eating in to Idol’s profits, so they cut back, which diminishes that promotion opportunity.

    I still think the reason for Idol’s big success stories has a lot to do with their early seasons when they were a novelty. After the novelty wore off, success is defined by true talent that stands out above the crowd, not just among the other Idol alums, but in the mainstream community of artists in the entertainment industry.

  • Ari

    God Adam looks horrible with a full beard. I thought the show was actually better with Shakira and Usher. Well theyve achieved their goal of not creating a star. The old argument is that this is a TV show…not an A&R show…So its a great way for the network to exploit all these kids (and ringers) who dont get big salaries. The coaches sign on to raise their profile, get great publicity to promote their music, get endorsements, and cash in huge paychecks. All of their careers (well maybe not Christina) got a big push. I guess its true – if some of these contestants can make al iving doing weddings and bar mitzvahs, and a few appearances at local clubs “as seen on The Voice” then thats better than going back to McDonald’s. The fact that more contestants havent gotten major pushes by their coaches demonstrates that the coaches dont think they really have star potential. Idol producers also in the past have said something similar – our job is to provide an entertaining TV show – the rest is a bonus…It was different whenpeople like Simon had something at stake – thats why he gets more involved with XF – because its his record label and his show.

  • Ari

    In the beginning it was even harder because THe Voice contestants only would perform once a month and the format where each coach got 1 person in the finals and coaches got to make more cuts than viewers made it hard for viewers to get invested. They have fixed a lot of these issues, but I guess most viewers don’t really care.

  • Ari

    And they succeeded

  • Ari

    They relaunched their careers and boosted their profiles incredibly AFTER appearing on the Voice. Its a great promotional opportunity. Maroon 5 had its best selling singles and albums; Adam got acting and endorsement roles (he had his own fragrance which he said he would never do); Blake wasnt really known much outside of country and his music has also skyrocketed; and Cee Lo got a show in Las Vegas. Christina maybe is the one who got the least bounce, but she was out of the limelight a lot until The Voice, known mainly for her divorce, new boyfriend and weight increase

  • Sassycatz

    Well theyve achieved their goal of not creating a star.

    LOL.

  • Ari

    They were hoping for the major JLO bump but never got it. Mariah could use a music bump – her music in recent years is nothing like here early albums and many claim she lip syncs all the time cuz her voice isnt what it used to be. I dont know that Keith was a huge star outside of country other than being Mr Nicole Kidman (but he did seem the most genuine and was experienced from working on The Voice Australia (why they didnt get Ricky Martin instead of him going to Australia, I dont know…Hispanics are a huge underrepresented audience)…and Nicki was hoping to expand her audience beyond hip hop and attract a more mainstream audience that could lead to other opportunities, endorsements, acting, etc

  • Ari

    Helped Blake get an audience OUTSIDE of pure country. The average person had no idea who he was

  • Ari

    What happened to Pia? Is she doing anything now? She was such a favorite and had so much publicity and sympathy when she was voted out. Every celebrity was tweeting about her and now it seems she’s doing an occasional National Anthem….and I still feel bad for Melanie Amaro and wonder what’s happening to her

  • Larc

    Very true. Ed was primarily interested in putting on a good show that would attract viewers and not offend anybody, not in advancing careers. He was more apt to lick his finger and raise it to see which way the wind was blowing. Rumor was he also liked talent that would work cheap. Interestingly, Ed ordered camera views not to drop below Elvis’s waist during his initial performance on the show because Ed thought Elvis’s pelvic gyrations when he sang were unsuitable for the TV audience.

  • Ari

    Well thats the thing with the Voice “RINGERS” who have had chances before. Previous winners – Colon for example had record deals before. Pope was probably the most famous contestant on a singing show ever. She was in a successful touring band and that was a totally unfair advantage as she had a substantial loyal existing fan base. We’ll see how Danielle does – she was promoted as their greatest hope.

  • Mel432

    Isn’t that too funny? Home is a good song with a really nice arrangement. I actually like the arrangement better than Phillip’s singing. Would that song have been as successful, if it wasn’t played during the most popular Olympic event?

  • taptap

    Why do contestants go on AI and TV? To make money during the season and to build their career.

    Why do Judges go on AI and TV? To make money during the season and to build their career.

  • elliegrll

    How does the tour open the alums up to new fans? The only people who attend are people who watched the alums on the show. Many of these people just see the idols are reality show contestants, so the tour doesn’t do anything to help them establish themselves as artists. Too many alums have jumped to the wrong conclusions based on the reception that they have received out on the tour, and they received a harsh wake up call once the tour was over.

  • thedeviledadvocate

    My mom wouldn’t let me listen to Rock&Roll on the radio, but my Grandpa watched Ed Sullivan, not Steve Allen, so for me, I was introduced to my all time favorite singer and all time favorite band by Ed Sullivan. That is why i say its apples to oranges. Soul Train and American Bandstand introduced (launched many careers).

    AI is more involved with launching these careers than the older shows were, of course, and it has been successful. I don’t think there is a show on television that compares to what AI has been able to accomplish, in regards to manufacturing a star.

    The Voice is competing with AI for viewers, and it has successfully gained enough viewers that it can compare its viewers to AI’s viewers. That is where the comparing ends. AI’s alumni to this point has been far more successful. Will Candice’s success be far greater than Cassadee or Danielle? Too early to tell, but my money is on Danielle.

  • thirdtime

    I think the only reason people were shocked about Pia’s early elimination is because she has such a great voice, but as we’ve seen time and time again, there is way more to being a huge star than just having a great voice. I saw many comments about Pia saying she is boring and stiff and when I attended the S10 tour people seemed distracted and uninterested when she was singing her single. I’m not surprised at all that she hasn’t caught on. Melanie Amaro though, seems like she was never even given a chance.

  • taptap

    Well imo those that jumped to the wrong conclusion were not very smart. Idol concert tour attendees are inside the bubble generally, not outside of it, and any artist who doesn’t understand this distinction isn’t very smart, and doesn’t bode well for their post-Idol experience.

    OTOH, there is certainly an opportunity for an idol to gain new fans from the idol-viewing fanbase at large during these tours, as performing live for the attendees can show something not seen on the televised show.

  • GenLeeUSA

    When I first watched this show. The only coach I knew was Xtina. I knew Blake was some country singer. Adam and CeeLo no clue to who they are. I did not know Adam was the front man of Maroon 5. So now they are pretty much a house hold name like Xtina. Usher and Shakira, I know who they are. They are pretty much mainstream. So, Adam, Blake, and Ceelo really got a career boost.

  • Mel432

    As far as judges, TV and AI are similar. Ceelo had some huge, huge hits, but was he really that popular as a solo artist? I know at one point he was opening for Rihanna. Levine wasn’t even a name most people knew. They were familiar with M5, but not Adam. Even M5 weren’t superstars. Everyone here already explained Blake. All the idol judges are NOW household names too. With that said, TV judges (with the exception of Ceelo) are just fun to watch interact with each other. It’s really entertaining watching Adam and Xtina argue, but not poisonous like Mariah and Nicki. That’s what AI needs. Charismatic judges who have chemistry.

  • Larc

    Except for the success of “Home,” GGG likely wouldn’t have seen the success it has. “Home” is the greatest gift any debuting Idol ever received, IMO. At least some of P2’s initial comments seemed to reflect a lack of total appreciation for it, but he’s hopefully since waked up and smelled the coffee.

  • TheOther

    And there’s is the success of his album. It’s been show that a successul single doesn’t always mean a successful CD.

  • ANNIEBA

    I agree that Adam Levine looks terrible with that full beard, what is he thinking? Not having watched the show much is he generally not the sharpest tool in the shed? Just seems the the totally wrong thing to say at a press conference. I do love “One More Night” though, lol.

  • thedeviledadvocate

    The only goal that I care about from any of these shows is the goal of being entertained and enjoying watching the show. In that regard, The Voice has achieved its goal with me as a viewer.

  • TheOther

    Phillip is with Interscope, not Sony.

  • Karen C

    At least it’s in roughly the same genre as his original music.

  • Sassycatz

    Crazy he didn’t realize that at the time. ;-)

  • usedtobelucy

    Thinking they should change the name then, I suggest: Them That’s Got Shall Get, Them That’s Not Shall Lose.

  • Onescoopyes

    Well American Idol’s original title was “American Idol: The Search For A Superstar.” So obviously that was the original intention.

  • Onescoopyes

    The ratings aren’t that great, and are actually similar to idol season 12.

  • Onescoopyes

    Scotty and Phillip both were on seasons that ran against the Voice and they are doing well.

  • taptap

    That’s because tv has become saturated with this type of talent show, and the viewers have split their time between them. It’s not likely that any show in this genre will revert to the ratings of the early Idol days. That doesn’t mean either AI or TV is going to be yanked off the air tomorrow (although it also doesn’t mean that they won’t).

    There’s a difference between ‘good’ and ‘good enough’, from a financial standpoint. Fans tend to focus on the good, on-the-ceiling ratings, but the money guys on the shows are looking for a profit floor. No matter how big the gap between floor and ceiling, anything above the floor (as they deem that number to be) is good enough, while anything below it (i.e. in the basement) is not.

    Since Idol hasn’t yet been cancelled, I assume the bean counters have determined that the profit is not yet in the basement.

  • Onescoopyes

    Michael Orland also tries his best to keep in touch with every alumni. He respects all of them.

  • taptap

    Phillip’s doing great, but if you’re not a country music fan, you haven’t heard of Scotty. Despite that I’m sure he’s doing fine right now, and is looking forward to future growth.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    See, I’ve got nothing against The Voice deciding its brand involves giving second chances to musicians who already have low-end or even mid-range careers. I’m all for other shows distinguishing themselves from Idol.

    What bugs me about The Voice is that, with rare exceptions, a musician leaves with essentially the same career prospects as he or she had before going on the show. Being an exception (a) requires starting from a very, very low base [lower than Javier Colon's very low pre-Voice major-label sales] and (b) accepting an extremely modest level of career improvement as “success” [mid-chart peaks on small formats].

    Again, this might turn around with Pope, if her label is sufficiently committed. It might turn around with Bradbery, ditto, especially because she was an unknown, so any sales are bigger than she’d have had before. Meanwhile, over on the Idol side, Interscope is a lot less evenhanded than RCA/Jive was about givin’ the ol’ school try to launching both winner and runner-up from Idol.

    Idol’s on the verge of losing me because when I vote for somebody who finishes in the top 2, I expect to see a serious effort at launching a music career… but The Voice isn’t going to grab me with the lure of voting so I can make some celebrity judge/mentor feel good.

  • Onescoopyes

    I wouldn’t even say its anymore successful than what idol is today, the ratings took a nosedive as the season went on.

  • Kariann Hart

    However, if the new PTB are sincere in making Idol a better show, they will look for exceptional talent. They may go along with their “casting list” but the search should go beyond that.

  • Kariann Hart

    Edit: Wrong show.

  • taptap

    What they’re really looking for in casting any reality show is contestants who can bring controversy. Of course if the finalists chosen by tptb can’t sing they’ll look like fools, but there are plenty of people who can sing well enough who either have or can make controversy.

    That’s why the front-end of Idol is loaded with joke contestants, and that’s why the back-end frequently ends up with artists who have only mediocre talent. Controversy is by far more important to most producers of reality shows.

    Big Brother is a great example. It’s easier for them, though, because they’re not trying to sell anyone on the idea that their contestants have any particular talent, outside of ability to play the game as they’ve devised it. And even that skill is not enough by itself, given the big role editing can play in the results.

  • Anny_nanny

    Javier and Jermain, if I am not confusing names.

  • Kariann Hart

    I have to agree. Just think of how many singers would have loved the Washington, DC gig. Honestly, Chris is my favorite to come off The Voice.

  • Mel432

    Adam Levine is pretty sharp on the show and funny as hell. However, sometimes to speaks w/o thinking of how things will come out. Like the hating America comment.

  • Valarie

    It seems to me that fans of the Voice may tire of the show, if no big effort is made to launch successful careers. Are the fans who vote and purchase multiple iTunes downloads going to continue to do so, if they don’t feel it will launch their snowflake into the stratosphere?

  • Ria.

    I care that they fixed a lot of issues. They made major changes in the Fall of 2012 which decreased how many cuts the judges make and improved the process. Because of this I watched the show more intently in the past 2 seasons. But the show still does not get me as invested in my favorites as Idol does.

  • taptap

    I think that you’re right – the viewers who want to be invested in the contestants didn’t like this show. I think the ones who like the show tend to be those who are in it for the general entertainment value (from judges and contestant performances and interactions, along with guest artist appearances), rather than investment in a specific act.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    Lucca’s new EP debuted at #180 on the BB 200 this past week. I can find Soundscan numbers on UKMix down to only #150, which sold 2,767.

    There are no sales numbers on Wikipedia for Lucca’s older releases, so it’s possible that selling fewer than 2,700 copies is a major sales improvement for him. On a normal no-radio decay curve, the EP could make it to total sales of ~5,000. There’s supposed to be a radio single but it hasn’t been released yet.

    At the moment, he appears to be piecing together a tour by being the first opener on a 3- to 5-band slate with various major headliners (not with one specific act, but whomever his path crosses), which isn’t significantly different from his pre-Voice work.

  • Listening

    When Idol winners disappear they do as well as the winners of the voice do w/ their debut album which in the past has been around 10K. I’m sorry the difference between sales of Idol winners and even Idol non- winners and Voice winners is just so vast it’s just laughable to draw any similarity. Like how is that even possible w/ the ratings that show gets.

    The gold star winners Kelly and Carrie are still around and very successful after more than 3 years. Then you got the much lower level of success Fantasia still around. Then you look at the non winners they’re still a few doing ok after 3 years. I imagine Daughtry and Kelly could easily get more than 10K anytime they put out an album. Oh and Jennifer Hudson.

    But I will say i’m encouraged by the response Danielle Bradbury and Cassadee Pope have gotten seems like they’ll break the voice’s string of lackluster/pitiful album sales.

  • usedtobelucy

    I’m not sure I’d call it “honesty” so much as “rationalization,” though. “Oh, nobody who’s come off this show has become a star or done much better in the industry than they did pre-show? Well, we never intended for that to happen anyway!”

    Which makes me say, ‘Oh? Then exactly who were you referring when you called the show “The Voice”? Christina? Adam? The announcer guy?’

    Seriously. Clearly somebody *was* thinking about a contestant becoming a star of some sort — because supposedly that person was one who would be so startlingly good that just the sound of his/her voice would make a bunch of industry veterans swing around in their chairs, transfixed by that voice’s amazingness.

    What does it say about the music industry if you set up a show with that premise but then say that even though there’s at least one contestant who’s so extremely compelling, you never figured that that person would get much of a career. (Actually, this is a clear fact about the music industry, of course. So I guess in addition to entertainment the show is a strong course in realism about the entertainment industry … Not intentionally so, though, I believe. They’re making all these statements *way* after the fact.)

  • Incipit

    “They’re making all these statements *way* after the fact.”

    They are indeed, usedtobelucy. The Goal Posts come with wheels, I think, for ease of movement.

    IMO.

  • Ria.

    I have a much less cynical view of Idol viewers. All of these shows need to be entertaining, first, or they will not get any ratings. Idol’s biggest failing this past season is that it was often a dull or even aggravating show so by the end it was mostly just hard-core fans were still watching.

    These shows also are all fueled by the votes of viewers. This accomplishes 3 things. 1) It makes the show less predictable from week to week than if the producers decided who advances. This includes the ‘shocking’ eliminations fans complain about for years after. 2) The voters feel more invested. They decide who they want to vote for.
    They only spend time, and sometimes money, voting for artists they are impressed with and this
    act of voting helps make them more invested in the artist. 3) Voters want to see their favorites establish themselves after the show. They voted for them not only because they didn’t want them to go home yet, but because they wanted to send a message to the record producers that they believe in the artist.

  • taptap

    But everyone knows it takes more than a voice alone for an artist/performer to capture the attention of fans, at least in the broader music industry, if not in the Idol bubble. So TV focuses on that aspect, they’re clear about that.

    Adam Levine and Justin Beiber could tell you how much their success in the industry relates to their voice (which is not very much in either case).

  • taptap

    I definitely agree that allowing the public to vote is done to get them invested in the show. Any reality tv show that has viewer voting or feedback does it with that in mind.

    However voter investment clearly does not correlate outside the bubble of the whatever reality show is under discussion, for the simple reason that the voters of any given show are not representative of the population outside that bubble.

    It doesn’t mean someone can’t break out of the bubble, but it does mean that the voters are an insular group who think they represent the world at large, and that often stops them from drawing the correct logical conclusions about why tptb do what they do.

  • Ria.

    These shows have high ratings on Network TV. The voters are not just a fringe group among society. If the voting results were completely out of tune with which contestants can have mass appeal, then the shows would change their voting schemes or their prizes. I maintain that it is judges/producers manipulations which cause many of the non-ideal results on this shows and not the voters. XF is a prime example. The judges regularly send home promising acts as soon as they get the chance and 5th Harmony should have gotten much more support during their season but instead their judge/mentor was focused on other acts and was probably shocked they did as well as they did.

  • thirdtime

    Or maybe they should change the name to The Judges.

  • Ria.

    ” The idea that Idol will always produce a big post-show winner is what
    makes some so disappointed in the seasons where that doesn’t happen.”
    I don’t think it is just me that gets disappointed or not in an Idol season as it is happening. Not years later when I know how successful the winner is post-show.

  • taptap

    Even the highest rated show only draws a small percent of the American population. And since the voting group within the viewing group is even smaller, the ones that vote are even less representative of America at large.

    The proof is obvious – many AI winners do not appeal to the larger, mainstream, music-buying population as evidenced by their lack of music sales.

    Every now and then one breaks out of the bubble and begins to be heard and seen in references by the mainstream media about pop culture, but they’re pretty few and far between.

    And the show would not change the voting schemes because they want to promote the large number of votes they get, even if it’s only from a small number of voters. It’s all about marketing and spin.

  • taptap

    I’m saying that if you say (or even imply) that you’re a show that makes stars, people will be disappointed when you don’t. That’s why TV is stepping back from that claim.

    They made the claim originally because they had to – they were jumping in the arena to compete with AI. But they’ve found now that their viewing demo is pretty happy with simply good television, and so are (probably happily) accepting that they don’t need to invest time and money after contestants once their season is over. They move on to the next batch, simply trying to make an entertaining season from them without the additional expenditure post-season.

  • kikileo

    But they aren’t judges they are “coaches.” Lol. Same thing, I know.

  • Ria.

    I’d guess there are at least 2 dozen idol contestants who have sold far
    more after the show than anyone from TV. Who has sold the most from TV? What are their approximate sales numbers?

  • Pat H

    I just saw a list of the final numbers for the 2012/2013 Season. Idol is #6 (performance shows) and #8 (results shows). DWTS is #7 & The Voice is #9. Which is why I can’t understand why Idol/FOX is not doing mrore to reverse the wrong perception that The Voice is doing better. IDGI!

    “The most-watched shows of the 2012-13 TV season, these averages include seven days’ worth of DVR usage included in their season averages:

    1. NCIS CBS 21.6 million
    2. SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL NBC 21.0 million
    3. THE BIG BANG THEORY CBS 19.0 million
    4. NCIS: LOS ANGELES CBS 17.5 million
    5. PERSON OF INTEREST CBS 16.2 million
    6. AMERICAN IDOL (Wednesday) Fox 15.1 million
    7. DANCING WITH THE STARS (Monday) ABC 15.0 million
    8. AMERICAN IDOL (Thursday) Fox 14.8 million
    9. THE VOICE (Monday) NBC 14.4 million
    10. THE WALKING DEAD AMC 14.3 million”

  • thedeviledadvocate

    So, we are basically comparing Idols 12 seasons of success, and the numerous albums released by Idol winners to the single album release of 1 Voice winner, which sold about 45k. I would certainly hope that Idol would dominate based on that criteria.

  • Ria.

    Most Idol winners are platinum selling artists.

  • taptap

    Any major label artist was almost assured of being platinum selling at least once if they were at their height before 2006. Of the artists since then, and that includes AI winners, this is not the case.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    What? I really question that 45k number EW has for Colon’s album.

    The lowest-selling Idol winner to date, Lee DeWyze, sold almost as much in his debut album’s first week than Colon’s entire sales for the album. So forget the multiple seasons of Idol — just compare Idol’s worst-performing winner to have released an album to The Voice’s lone album releaser.

    Or you could compare Idol’s 2nd and 3rd place winners who’ve released major-label albums. Most (all? I’m too lazy to look it up) have sold better than Colon.

    It’s not that people are cherry-picking to compare Idol’s huge successes to Voice’s track record, while Idol has a large number of similar low sellers. It’s that Glover will have to tank on an epic scale to do as badly as the Voice’s lone winner to release an album so far, while both Pope and Bradbery will have to put in quite solid sales numbers to have stronger album sales than Idol’s weakest winner pre-Glover.

  • Ria.

    You can eliminate Carrie, Kelly, Daughtry, Clay, Fantasia, Ruben, Cook, Pickler, Sparks, Hudson, Archuleta, and Lambert, Hicks and Allen, from the discussion as well as any other Idol from seasons 1-9. We can even throw in Scotty and Phillip even though they are from the last few seasons and there is no good reason to exclude them. Where do recent Voice contestants stack up compared to Lauren or James Durban or Haley or Casey in terms of sales?

  • girlygirl

    That 45K is probably close to being right. The first week sales for Javier’s album were less than 10K, according to wikipedia:

    “Come Through For You” had sales of 9974 units its first week according to Soundscan. Despite being the winner of the first season of The Voice, Javier’s album was outsold by Red, the album of the first season’s runner-up, Dia Frampton. As of June 2013, the album has sold 46,000 copies in the US.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Come_Through_for_You

  • kikileo

    The judges on Idol are there to re-launch their own careers.

    Nicki, Keith and Ellen(haha) sure didn’t need to. They were all doing fine and didn’t need the show.

  • James

    IMO they are not being upfront about a thing and are just making excuses for the lack of success that any of their winners have had.

  • Ria.

    So that is comparable to Haley Reinhart’s 44k, and much less than Colton Dixon’s 100k, James Durbin’s 109k or Lauren Alaina’s 303k.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Idol_alumni_album_sales
    And I am still not comparing apples to apples because I am ignoring the idol winners.

  • James

    I totally agree without question they would love to have a star and their saying they don’t care about have a star is just lip service.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    If we calculate in Track Equivalent Albums (so 1 album sale = 10 singles sales, and this is an industry-accepted measure, not something I’m making up), Lauren Alaina’s debut probably outsold the post-Voice releases of all Voice alumni (not just winners) combined.

  • Happyhexer

    Blake was starting to find his footing in the country world BEFORE The Voice started. It was a confluence of events, including the length of his career, his snarky twitter presence (my country DJs talked about that a lot), his relationship with Miranda Lambert, etc. etc. I’m always surprised he doesn’t sell more albums with his current profile, though. He’s got a decent voice but his singles run the gamut in musical style (within the country framework, of course) and subject matter. For those and other reasons, a Blake Shelton song on the radio is not as instantly identifiable to me in the same way, as, for example, a Luke Bryan or Eric Church song.

  • Ria.

    Yet all but 1 Idol winner since 2006 has a Platinum album or single or both.
    ETA: Jordin has a platinum album and several platinum singles, Cook has a platinum album and 2 platinum singles, Allen has a platinum single, McCreery has a platinum album and gold singles, Phillips will soon have a platinum album and has 2 platinum singles.

  • Dej

    I see the effort with Cass and Danielle.

  • waitingforthe1

    the first season that was their intention but after that not so much anymore. not once the judges got as much press, if not more, than the contestants.

  • jpfan2

    Phillip has a 4xplat single in Home. Home was the best selling single every released by anyone from Idol.

  • taptap

    You can’t nest platinum singles and platinum albums together – they’re not the same thing at all.

  • jujubee22

    the goal of any television show is to sell advertising and make money. My goal in watching any tv show is to be entertained. If I discover an artist I want to follow after the show, all the better, but I don’t need to in order to find watching the show enjoyable. The format of the Voice just makes it very hard for any alum to come of the show with a big bang.

  • ladymctech

    I was just coming over here after seeing the comments in my email to say something similar. Idol, especially Simon talks/has talked about the “total package.” I always took that to mean that more than just your voice counts in determining who has star quality, and as many have said here and other places, the best singers aren’t always the biggest starts. So, if that is the case, it almost makes the point of the Voice somewhat moot. So much for being such a great singer that someone in the industry is willing to work with you sight unseen and knowing nothing else otherwise about you.

  • ladymctech

    “I’m not sure I’d call it “honesty” so much as “rationalization”… Very true, rationalization may be the better term as these comments are coming after 4 seasons of no one really breaking out to stardom, at least to date.

  • taptap

    A great voice without charisma and stage presence – performing skills – won’t get you far. Although I didn’t watch until the last few episodes this season, I thought that was Kree’s problem. She could sing, but she had no presence, imo.

    otoh, if you have extreme charisma and stage presence, you can maybe get by with a less than stellar voice, since production in the studio and stage/set design can do so much to cover that weakness up.

    Of course the best of both worlds is charisma and artistic talent. Unfortunately in the industry today, an an artist can have both of these things and still not get ‘discovered’, which is why a tv platform – either AI or TV – can make all the difference for a talented artist who works hard and has a modicum of good business sense.

  • Ria.

    If we only count platinum albums, then Sparks, Cook, McCreery, and Phillips are winners since 2006 who have had a platinum album. My point still stands. Allen is also a “platinum selling artist” because he has a platinum single. At least 2 non-winners since 2006 also have platinum singles – Archuleta and Lambert. When we are comparing them to contestants of The Voice, there is no comparison. No one from The Voice has a platinum or gold anything. Not even close.
    ETA: my point is not to say anything negative about the contestants from The Voice. They just come no where close to Idol in terms of post-show sales.

  • taptap

    When the industry talks about platinum recording artists, they mean those who have platinum albums. You can get the equivalent by multiplying the average number of tracks on an album (12-14 before bonus tracks) by 1 million. So if an artist doesn’t have a platinum selling album, but has sold ~13M single tracks, then that is ~ equivalent. Lambert has over 4M in single track sales – so that’s 4x platinum, but it’s still not a platinum album.

  • Ria.

    ” They move on to the next batch, simply trying to make an entertaining season from them without the additional expenditure post-season.”

    But there has been zero evidence of this. Season 13 just ended and it was far from an example of them just wanting good tv and not caring about the winner. On the contrary the entire season was a painful experiment in foregoing good tv in an attempt to control who could win.

    The only previous season that produced no bona fide hit singles and/or albums is 9. Season 9 was a special case because it was the last year with RCA and there were indications they were willing to produce and promote the albums on the cheap. The coronation song wasn’t even a new song. It was a cover of an older song that still got radio play at the time. It was not big surprise it did not take off.

  • taptap

    By ‘they’ I was talking about TV not investing in post-season promotion, not Idol, which clearly does.

  • Ria.

    I have always understood “Platinum selling artist” to indicate at least 1 platinum single or album, in the US. If someone could total up all their sales and have sold more than a million albums or more than a million singles, then I would expect them to be billed as an artist with “more than a million records sold.” Platinum should indicate a platinum certification. Though I am sure there are those who would gladly play fast and loose with the term.

  • taptap

    Albums are certified, singles are not. You can count single tracks, and you can add world-wide sales, and they can be any number (platinum in the US, platinum in China, etc.) but that has nothing to do with certification.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    When the industry talks about platinum recording artists, they mean those who have platinum albums. You can get the equivalent by multiplying the average number of tracks on an album (12-14 before bonus tracks) by 1 million. So if an artist doesn’t have a platinum selling album, but has sold ~13M single tracks, then that is ~ equivalent.

    No. The industry standard for track-equivalent albums is that 10 singles = 1 album, not 12-14 singles = 1 album.

    Music Row source (where author is cranky about it): http://www.musicrow.com/2011/05/rethinking-track-equivalent-albums/

    NY Times source (a few years old, but it’s for the definition): http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/04/business/media/04music.html?_r=0

    Also, Kris Allen is routinely referred to as a “platinum-selling recording artist,” based solely on singles (here’s one such mention, though Googling will find more that are news/press releases, not fan sites: http://musicempowersfoundation.org/mobile-news.html )

    So while I strongly favor using TEA to normalize numbers for comparison of artists who are “album sellers” versus artists who are “singles sellers,” there doesn’t seem to be an industry standard that “platinum-selling” can’t be used for an artist with platinum singles but not platinum albums.

  • Eilonwy_has_an_emu

    Albums are certified, singles are not.

    Wait, what? Pay a visit to RIAA. Singles are absolutely certified gold and platinum. They are certified separately from albums, but they are definitely certified and have been since 1958.

  • taptap

    Sorry, you’re right. My point all along is that talking about platinum albums and singles together is mixing apples and oranges.

  • september21

    guess i’ll comment…wth. idol, voice, etc…just updated model of star search and the Apollo… Gong Show….i’m sure there are others even earlier than those. Just updated for new social media world, cell phones and digital iTunes instantly etc etc. and hasn’t the panel of coaches or burnett said this stuff already? did they just pull up last years story and change the date?
    I still think the red chair part of the show is better than simon in idols glory days! Yet still…long live Kelly Clarkson!!!!

  • usedtobelucy

    “A great voice without charisma and stage presence – performing skills –
    won’t get you far. Although I didn’t watch until the last few episodes
    this season, I thought that was Kree’s problem. She could sing, but she
    had no presence, imo.’

    ITA!

    My only point, really, is that they deliberately *named* the show after some *contestant* who would supposedly turn out to be a star … Hence ”*THE* Voice” (plus persona, x-factor and idolishness, as you say, but, still *THE* new singing star..).

    So, to me, it’s a little late now — and rings hollow — to claim that the show isn’t actually about contestants who turn out to be able to turn their star qualities into significant entertainment careers.

    In my opinion, they should just sit back and enjoy their success as a tv show — because by saying, “Oh, we never meant to be the star-making machinery behind the popular song,” all they’re doing is showing how insecure they are about that. Like so many of the people we discuss here, they need better pr advice, if you ask me!

  • Incipit

    Agreed, usedtobelucy, and a tip of the hat for the Joni Mitchell reference, BTW. Really, the whole first verse could apply. *snerk*

    IMO.

  • girlygirl

    If the main point of The Voice isn’t to launch a star, then why even bother giving the winner a recording contract? Why not just give him/her/them a cash prize?

    Obviously the show needs to be entertaining and get good ratings to stay on the air, but to claim the main point of the show isn’t to try and find a star comes off to me as very disingenuous.

  • usedtobelucy

    “Really, the whole first verse could apply. *snerk*

    Sure could. heh

  • BlownAwayBy Danielle

    In addition to her June 4th Voice launch, Cassaddee also made an appearance on the CMT Music Awards 2 days later. Danielle’s single, on the other hand, was launched quietly, in the middle of the night (literally at midnight EDT).

  • BlownAwayBy Danielle

    Danielle Bradbery will render this entire subject matter moot in short order. Just saying. You can take these words to the bank.

  • girlygirl

    Maybe, maybe not. Country radio hasn’t exactly raced to play her single and her sales were lower than Cassadee’s (although Cassadee had a bigger platform from which to promote her single).

    Danielle is very talented, but there are a ton of very talented young female country artists out there right now, all fighting for attention, sales, radio play, etc.

    And as we all know, nothing in life is guaranteed except death and taxes.

  • lollamape

    “And as we all know, nothing in life is guaranteed except death and taxes.”

    Hahaaa.. So true!

  • thedeviledadvocate

    Regardless what spin Carson and Adam are putting on it, they are hoping that both Cassadee and Danielle are very successful. She won the 100k prize and was signed to Big Machine Records. So, the ball is really no longer in The Voice’s court as far as Danielle’s success. The Voice has fulfilled their part of the bargain, but they will likely assist in any way they can to help Danielle and Cassadee succeed, (i.e. future performances on the Voice).

    Republic Nashville and Big Machine are pushing Cassadee and Danielle pretty hard. They are investing money in both of them, and these companies have a good track record in country music. Does everyone really think these companies are throwing away their money on Cassadee and Danielle? Also, do you really believe that TPTB at the Voice could care less about these girls success, when if one or both become successful it will stop all the The Voice has never had a success story rhetoric?

  • thedeviledadvocate

    There are a ton of very talented young female country artists out there right now, fighting for attention and radioplay. How many of those are signed with Big Machine and has a current single out that is being played on the radio? We will see if Big Machine can work its magic, but these things take time in country music. Danielle’s single has only been out two weeks, and her first radio adds were only one week ago. Give The Heart Of Dixie three more weeks and see where it is on the country airplay charts, you may be surprised, or do you believe that Big Machine is going to cut their losses and quit pushing her, and THOD will drop completely off the airplay charts in 3 weeks?

  • gem2477

    Actually they aren’t being honest. Carson says things about launching a superstar and starting careers all the time on the show.

  • gem2477

    Why would any serious artist audition knowing this? They would be better off just working on their career at home rather than waste time on the show.

  • gem2477

    Her first week sales would beg to differ. I wish her success, but it doesn’t seem that likely.

  • Dej

    Considering that she hardly no promo for that, they were pretty solid numbers. Again, I think she’s going to end up proving a lot of people wrong.

  • Dej

    Watched a few interviews with her over the weekend not posted here. I think the kid has a charisma to her. Coupled with her voice, I’d definitely invest in her I were a record exec. I’m not saying she’ll be an overnight success (talent shows just don’t have that much pull anymore) but once they develop her a bit more and with Blake’s backing, yeah I think this girl can be something.

  • Ria.

    Singles are certified platinum. Kris Allen’s Live Like We Are Dying is certified platinum, as are singles from Sparks, Cook, and Phillips. I
    am having trouble finding certification data, today, for Archis’s Crush, and Lambert’s Whadaya Want From Me. But they both sold well over a
    million in the US. I thought I had seen them listed as platinum in the past but maybe I am mistaken.

    http://www.riaa.com/

    In the industry, if someone is a one hit wonder and sold almost no albums, they will still be referred to as a Platinum selling artist if that hit is platinum. That has always been my understanding.

    I am not referring to any international numbers. As you say, “platinum” in other countries means something very different from “platinum” in the US where it indicates 1 million. In other countries
    “platinum” can mean 50k, 15k, etc. It takes a lot of those to come anywhere close to 1 mil. It would be completely misleading to refer to an artists as platinum due to international certifications unless you specified it is “international” or “outside the US.”

  • girlygirl

    No, of course Danielle’s song won’t drop off the chart in the next few weeks, and no, Big Machine won’t stop promoting her anytime soon. But that’s not what I’m saying.

    They might not be signed to Big Machine, but Kacey Musgraves has gotten radio play and already won awards as a songwriter. Jana Kramer has already had a fairly big radio hit. Etc etc etc. Big Machine is not the only label that can promote its artists. And not everyone signed to Big Machine is a star.

    I’m looking at the current iTunes country chart. Of the Top 20 selling songs, 3 are by women – 2 by Taylor Swift and 1 by Carrie Underwood. Miranda Lambert has a single at #28. Sheryl Crow’s single is at #30. So five songs out of the Top 30 are by solo female artists — and all 4 of the artists are big-name artists. That’s not a very promising %, IMO (Danielle’s single is currently #51 on the iTunes country chart).

    Now let’s look at the Mediabase country radio chart. There are 2 solo female artists in the Top 20. Carrie Underwood and Sheryl Crow. That’s it. Of the “less established” female artists, Kacey Musgraves is at #28, Maggie Rose is at #32, Cassadee Pope is at #37 and Jana Kramer is at #43 (Taylor Swift and Miranda Lambert also have singles charting).

    Country music is still very much a good ol’ boys club. No matter how talented Danielle is or how much Big Machine pushes her, there’s no guarantee she will become a star. I’m not saying that she won’t or she can’t go on to become a star. Maybe she will, I’m just saying it is far from guaranteed.

  • Incipit

    “Singles are certified platinum…”

    Yes, they are. Also, they are certified Gold, if the Label wants to pursue that. Digital sales don’t take as long to certify, for obvious reasons.

    If someone from the Label orders them, the Singers and the Songwriters can get both gold and platinum plaques. They are not terribly expensive, but that can add up, I guess.

    When Zac Maloy, a co-writer on “Come Back to Me” got his Gold Plaque and tweeted a picture, that’s how we found out the single was certified gold. MJ covered the story here.

  • thedeviledadvocate

    Kacey and Jana are awesome. I would love to see more female country singers on the charts than the big 3 (Miranda, Carrie and Taylor). I think that talent like Kacey’s deserves to join them. It is time for a shift in country music and the females need a larger share of chart positions. 5 of 30 is too lopsided, there needs to be about 5 more girls in the top 30. That still would give the guys a 66% to 33% advantage over the girls, but as you say, country music is dominated by the guys. I would like to see Cassadee and Danielle do more than just make a little peep on the charts. I realize it is mostly wishful thinking on my part, but it would be nice to hear more females singing country on the radio than we currently hear.

    I love The Voice, but I kind of think that they are being a little cowardly about this whole finding a star thing. Even if it is true that it is not their job to make a star (Idol is actually set up that way, and it works very well for Idol), for them to say that is not their main goal might hurt them in terms of people auditioning for the show. Why audition for The Voice if they aren’t looking for a star? As a fan of The Voice, that kind of talk from Adam and Carson was more than just a little disheartening.

  • Ria.

    ” My point all along is that talking about platinum
    albums and singles together is mixing apples and oranges.”

    I see your point. I was not trying to be misleading. I think I was using the term correctly.
    For
    the purposes of this convo, we are comparing Voice contestants to Idol
    contestants. To date there is really no comparison in terms of record
    sales of either singles or albums. If we were comparing artists with
    more equivalency, then I would agree you need to look at more than just
    platinum (or gold) certifications, and take into account other factors.
    I think from an industry
    standpoint the reason why they don’t always make a distinction between
    “platinum selling” in singles alone and “platinum selling” in albums is
    because a hit single can generate more revenue than just sales of the
    single. A hit single is generally accompanied by massive radio play. It
    gets into the public consciousness even for many millions of people who
    never buy it. It can make the performer a household name. It can get
    played on the radio for years. It can also generate licensing fees, sell
    music videos, sell ring tones, etc.

    So while one album generates
    much more revenue than one single, a popular single is also an
    important distinction in the industry.

  • http://scooterksu.blogspot.com/ Scooter McGavin

    I had to laugh when Christina made the absurd statement that Chris Mann is the most successful artist to come from The Voice a couple seasons ago, but now I have to shame my head when people actually take that statement as fact. There is no need to have an opinion on who is the most successful alum because there are actual metrics to determine who is the most successful and it certainly is not Chris Mann. The title of most successful has to go to Dia Frampton who as sold four times more albums than Chris, four times for Facebook likes, three times more YouTube subscribes (Dia’s most watched video: 2.1 million; Chris’s: 300K; Dia’s videos have been watched 2.5 million more times that Chris with 75 less videos), three times more twitter followers, and eight times more Spotify followers. In fact, Dia’s least streamed song on Spotify has been streamed more often than Chris’s most streamed song and her most popular song has been streamed 1 million more than his most popular song. Dia even has a gold record to her name. So really until someone else can manage to get a gold record from The Voice, Dia will probably be the most successful alum even if by default.

  • Ria.

    ” So really until someone else can manage to get a gold record from The Voice, Dia will probably be the most successful alum even if by default.”

    What record does Dia have that is gold?

  • http://scooterksu.blogspot.com/ Scooter McGavin

    Dia only has the one (solo) album Red which went Gold in Thailand which I know is not that impressive, but that is still one Gold album more than every other Voice contestant combined. And it was enough to warrant an Asian tour, no one else from the Voice (that I am aware of) has toured internationally. It was also enough that she is currently working on a second album for the label, something doubt Chris Mann will do because he did worse than Javier Colon who has already been dropped from the label. Plus Dia will be featured on a song from the next Crystal Method album which apparently will be the single because they just filmed a music video for it.

  • BlownAwayBy Danielle

    I bet Danielle to win the Voice after her performance of “Jesus Take the Wheel”. The odds were 9:1 against her winning. As far as I know, there is no betting line on the proposition, “Will Danielle Bradbery be the next female country superstar?”. If there was, fair odds should about about 4 or 5 to 1 against. I would take those odds again, in a heart beat.

    Admittedly, her 1st week sales (78K) trailed Cassadee’s (125K). But Danielle’s single was literally released in the dead of night (midnight EDT) while Cassadee launched on June 4th on the Voice and followed up with an appearance on CMT Music awards 2 days later. In spite of being launched under the cover of darkness, “Dixie” gained the top of the itunes country chart during the “robust” selling hours of midnight to 8:00AM EDT.

    All things considered, Danielle’s 78K is quite remarkable. It exceeded the weekly sales of everyone of her Voice performances, all launched on national TV on the Voice. And it held the top spot for nearly four days, longer than any of her Voice performances did. I’m not sure what others were expecting, but Dixie’s performance has exceeded my expectations. And I’m comfortable, it’s consistent with being the first step on a “journey of 1,000 miles”.

    Time will tell!!