The Television Critics Association is holding it’s annual winter tour in Los Angeles. It was NBC network day on Friday. You can read my Smash update HERE.

Here are a few highlights from The Voice panel. Coaches Christina Aguilera, Blake Shelton, Adam Levine and Cee Lo Green plus host Carson Daly were on hand to take reporter questions.

The Voice Announces 8 Celebrity Advisers!

  • Christina: “This year, we are diving more into critiquing. … You see us more in depth in the coaching process. I think this year you’re going to see it more. Last year we were all finding our own comfort zone.”
  • Adam: “There’s a different between critical and willfully just mean. There’s a constructive way to tell someone they weren’t as good as they could have been,” Adam Levine said. “Telling someone they were terrible doesn’t get us anywhere.”
  • Adam: “The talent level is so high there aren’t too many God-awful performances even if someone has an off night. It made our jobs really difficult because everybody was really, really good.”
  • Blake (on his celeb mentors, wife Miranda Lambert and pal Kelly Clarkson: “…both survived reality television shows. I just wanted somebody who could talk to them about what they’re going through. … And also they’re both really hot.”
  • Christina: “[The Voice] really gives artists that aren’t so mainstream or commercially approachable [a chance]. It’s about taking it back to the real heart of music. We all are [drawn to packages]. But then again there’s that raw talent that draws you in.”
  • Adam: “I trust the show more than I trust the record industry at this point. I’m really passionate about this show being a new avenue [for new artists].”
  • There is a rapper on Christina’s team
  • Adam on The Voice alum’s poorly-selling albums, “We can’t control everything that happens in the record industry. You got to set it free at a certain point. You can’t be there for every step of the way. I would like to see people be as successful as possible.”
  • Carson: “Those albums are arguably better than those in the top 50, so it’s all perspective. The music that [season one contestants] put out, I would take that to a music street fight any day.”
  • The Voice will kick off its second season with all four judges performing a Prince medley.

Sources: TV Guide, EOnline

A couple of thoughts:  The Idol judges have said they’ll dish out more critiques this year, but for both Idol and The Voice, I’ll believe it when I see it.  I don’t think the members of either panel can stomach dishing the tough love.

Adam dodged the record sales question.  I think there were real issues around how Javier and Dia were managed post show.  Not to mention how there was so much focus on the famous coaches, it was easy to forget the winners once the cameras were turned off.

The panelists were shown a clip of the Prince medley, and the reactions were pretty lulzy.  Tim Goodman from THR tweeted, “Man, Prince is gonna be pissed about this clip…’That is how it’s done!’ – Carson Daly. No, actually, it’s done how Prince does it.

The Insider’s Jarrett Wiselman tweeted, “#TheVoice coaches clearly employ the Spice Girls’ style rules when it comes to expressing your individuality through fashion #YoullSee”

Also there were various Christina boob jokes sprinkled throughout the commentary.  Andy Dehnart from Reality Blurred tweeted, “The Voice season two will apparently feature two new judges, thanks to Christina Aguilera’s absurdly low-cut clothing.”  Xtina sure likes to show off the girls!

The new season of The Voice premieres Sunday, Feb. 5 on NBC after the Super Bowl.

  • http://twitter.com/blkeener Brittany Keener

    ugh. I think I just vomited a little. “Those albums are arguably better than those in the top 50, so it’s all perspective.” LOL It’s all perspective till they all get dropped again, forgotten more than they already have. And Adam’s all “you have to let them free….” Sure, but you *could* support them still. At least Blake made some attempt in supporting Dia & Xenia.
    And of course, the judges praise the show…look how well it’s done for THEM. I don’t hate it as much as I do XF…but it still irks me when the judges have more STAGE time than the contestants.

  • Anonymous

    thay need something to make the contestants more memorable cause 6 performances in the course of 10 weeks (the winner) isnt enough, really. i cant remember anyone except for dia, javier, beverly and vicci.

    or maybe its just that the show its all about the judges.

  • BonnieDee

    I won’t be watching this again.  The whole format is bad and the show seems to be about promoting Blake, Christina, Adam, and Cee-Lo.  No thanks.

  • Anonymous

    I hope Season 2 has more of a slower, methodical pace to it now that they have more time…

  • Emmy

    No plans to watch again. This show is all about the judges who unfortunately are real asses. 

  • Anonymous

    Adam dodged the record sales question.  

    Of course Adam dodged the question because so many of his comments on the show and in the press about idol came back to bite him in his @ss. Both the winnner & runner-up from the Voice had opening sales  far below even the 4th place finisher on idol.  Blake did a better job trying to build up their artist than Adam did but the overall promo/mgmt was pretty bad.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_X5MFW5AZRKGSJZ4YII2TZUSJCM SallyinChicago

    “The talent level is so high there aren’t too many God-awful performances even if someone has an off night. It made our jobs really difficult because everybody was really, really good.”They all say that.  Word for word it sounds like Randy.

    “Adam dodged the record sales question.  I think there were real issues around how Javier and Dia were managed post show. ”
    This show doesn’t have the same machine behind the contestants as Idol does.  Idol took a page from Motown and they nuture their artists so that when they go out on stage and in front of thousands, they are READY.  The voice is using “second” chance contestants.  They have  past performing and recording experience, but they haven’t been nurtured.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_X5MFW5AZRKGSJZ4YII2TZUSJCM SallyinChicago

    My comment below — Idol has a “machine” that truly puts a lot of money and muscle behind its winners being stars.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_X5MFW5AZRKGSJZ4YII2TZUSJCM SallyinChicago

    Most if not all of their contestants are failed singers who were on Broadway or coffee shops, lost a record contract, or ex-Idols.

  • http://twitter.com/KariannHart Kariann Hart

    Everything already said is so true. I have mentioned before that the X-Factor and The Voice are competitors. Reading the comments made, it is obvious this is true. Both have similar views towards the value of the judges over the contestants.

    “Telling someone they were terrible doesn’t get us anywhere.”

    Now, gee I wonder who he was talking about? The irony of this is that Javier and Dia are truly talented, but they need support from the show. If they are in the same time slot as DWTS, I will probably go with the dance show.

  • Anonymous

    Javier is managed by Steve Brush from the International Artists Agency. Who also list Marc Anthony & Taylor Hicks as clients.
    http://www.iaatalent.com/artists.html 

    Dia is managed by Mike Kaminsky, owner of KMGMT Artist Management who list 3OH!3 & The Summer Set as clients.  
    http://www.kmgmt.com/ 

    So, I get your point. I wonder if The Voice contestants have to find their own management after the show with no set mgmt deal in place.

  • dancingqueen

    I do believe the contestants were poorly managed & promoted post show.  Personally, I think Javier’s CD is really good, but, they kept the price too high, and didn’t get him guest spots on the usual talk or music shows.  Other than a commercial on a few stations, who would have known he released anything, besides those of us who were waiting for it?

  • Anonymous

    I guess that’s celebrity culture taken to the nth degree. Even contest shows are now about the (sometimes waning) celebs on the show, not about development and struggle of new people. Cause, hey, why should we care about those new people — they’re not *CELEBRITIES.*  In other words, them that has, gets. Not much attention to spare for you newcomers. Yuck.

  • Anonymous

    didn’t ever watch….nothing here makes me want to watch this year………

  • Kirsten

    Adam: “We can’t control everything that happens in the record industry. You
    got to set it free at a certain point. You can’t be there for every step
    of the way. I would like to see people be as successful as possible.”

    LOL. Way to wash your hands of that one. He sounds a bit like a narcissistic parent there.

    If Idol can negotiate contracts with a label to provide some support for its contestants and with a management firm that can actually get them some promo opportunities, why can’t the Voice? Why does goofball AGT produce singers that sell more albums? Landau not only opened bigger than either of The Voice winner or runner-up, he is still in the top 100 on the BB200. His album was dropped the same day (Nov 21st) as Javier’s which peaked at 134 and fell off the chart the next week. Jackie’s success speaks for itself and even Michael Grimm had more success than Javier, Dia and Xenia.

    I could see if one album faltered, one could say that these things sometimes can happen. But if all three albums released so far flopped so badly, it becomes difficult to just hand wave it away. It begins to look like an indictment of the system…that something needs to change.

    What Adam should have said is a paraphrase of “That was our first time. Mistakes were made. We’ll try to fix them this year.”  but what he said is “Not our fault. Not our job. Not changing a thing.”. I begin to suspect though, that what he said is what the judges, the show and NBC intend to do.

    Why should they change? They brought in 12M viewers. The judges’ careers got a shot in the arm. Why mess with success? If they stop upstaging the contestants with the judges, then they might lose that thing that makes them look special. Plus, it isn’t as profitable for the judges to be on the show.  Nobody seems to care if the Next Top Model ever becomes a Top Model (has any?) or that the winner of a cooking show actually gets to run their own kitchen in a major restaurant.

    This year will be a test. If the viewers return despite the lack of success of Javier/Dia/AnyContestant, then obviously, that’s not a factor they need to worry about. The day after the finale, they can just sweep the contestant out with the confetti and start planning for next season.

    Adam: I’m really passionate about this show being a new avenue [for new artists].”

    How can he possibly say that with a straight face at this point? Especially given his other quote.

  • Anonymous

    LMAO, Adam Levine is such a douchebag.

  • http://twitter.com/KWOnlyDreaming Karen W.

    Out of all the judges, Blake is the only one who has helped at least Dia and Xenia after the show.  Dia is going to be touring with him and I’m pretty sure he’s been involved in helping Xenia also.   I haven’t heard anything about the other judges.

    I will definitely watch the Voice again.  I enjoyed Season 1.  My 14 year old son watched it as well.  He refuses to watch Idol and did not watch X Factor either. I think the Voice does bring in a younger audience.

  • Jae

    The Voice is definitely about the cool celeb judges and the contest between them. I know my friends and I liked certain contestants but most of our discussion was about which team we liked. I was Team Adam last year mostly. I was pleased that Javier won but happier that Adam won, if that makes any since. I think something about the way the show works really makes the show less a competition to find a good singer than a competition between the judges. Not sure why it feels that way. Xfactor nor idol feel like that to me. But I still like the Voice. I may have to be steam Blake this year with Kelly on his team. Though I really like Neyo.

  • Anonymous

    This show did GREAT for the judges.  Adam (and Christina) had his biggest hit ever.  CeeLo just got bigger, and Blake really became known outside the country community (I had never even heard of him before).

    The sad thing is, when the show ends the judges are in direct competition with their own contestants.  And their press, buzz, and chart power totally overshadowed anything the winner or runner-up could hope to do. 

  • Anonymous

    All of the Idol winners and runners up have some kind of a career in the music industry. Many other idols have done so as well. I wonder of the same will be true of The Voice contestants? Something tells me it will be much more difficult for them.

  • Anonymous

    The voice is using “second” chance contestants.  They have  past performing and recording experience, but they haven’t been nurtured.

    You could be right, but that’s funny considering that The Voice is the show that has mentoring as one of it’s selling/promotional points.  The AI contestants are coached too, but it’s never really been a very visible or major part of the show.

    It pains me to say this, but aside from AI’s larger audience, and the increased attention that it gets from the media, the biggest difference might be 19R.  Even though it seems like they haven’t done anything over the past ten years, they may do enough to ensure that the alums get some attention when their albums are released, and that hardcore fans know that there is musical that is available.

    The people who produce the show are only concerned with the ratings, and don’t have the know how or the desire to put together a businesses like 19 R and M.

  • Tess

    I agree with Kirsten…this show is really the same as Top Chef, or America’s Top Model, or even Project Runway.  It is all about the competition, the judges, and the show itself with the contestants just being additional props to work around.  Didn’t watch last year…won’t watch this year.  I am not enamored by the judges nor do I like the fact that the contestants were basically all “professionals” who weren’t good enough to break out of the bar and lounge acts where they were when the show found them.

    Too many other good things to watch on TV to waste my time on this.

  • Anonymous

    I could see if one album faltered, one could say that these things sometimes can happen. But if all three albums released so far flopped so badly

    It’s four.  Beverly Mcclellan released an album the same day that Javier did.  In The Voice’s defense in regards to her, she’s not signed to UMG.

  • Kirsten

    It pains me to say this, but aside from AI’s larger audience, and
    the increased attention that it gets from the media, the biggest
    difference might be 19R.

    LOL. After years of thinking 19R just showed up to collect money and 19M is kinda useless in its cookie-cutter way (just phone up the usual suspects and they say “yes”), I  may have to admit that they are the real power behind the success of Idols. Who knew they were some kind of promo ninjas that other shows wish they had access to? Well, at least the Voice contestants wish they had that kind of promo. The judges get great promo.

    It’s four. Beverly Mcclellan released an album the same day that Javier did. In The Voice’s defense in regards to her, she’s not signed to UMG.

    Oh dear. I live in the bubble and I completely missed it (I may have to hand in my Bubble Citizenship Card because goodness knows The Voice did it’s best to make sure everybody knew about it).

    So, 3 of the 4 finalists have released albums and they all tanked (plus Xenia – who was in the 5-8 position so I’ll cut everybody some slack).

  • Garrett Clayman

    Listen “The Voice” had a much quicker turn around than Idol, but people still forgot about them. Even on a indie label James Durbin sold in circles around Javier Colon. They dont even have a single at any radio station, so its clear they dont care about their alum. What makes Idol a great show that has been around for a decade? The fact that it actually creates stars, and if the Voice cant do it then what’s the point of watching

  • Anonymous

    Ugg, Adam Levine is ridiculous.  “There’s a different between critical and willfully just mean.”

    Yeah, but you have no trouble throwing other artists under the bus in your critiques.

  • mchcat

    I started to watch this last year, but had to quit – just plain didn’t like it

  • mmb

    I enjoyed the Voice last year, but only due to the interplay between the judges. I found it entertaining. Didn’t really pay much attention to the contestants. And that is unlikely to change so long as there are 4 current, in the prime of their career-heard every day on the radio judges. The judges are the stars of the show in a way they never were in the early days of Idol; until last year the judges were never in competition for sales or radio play with the contestants the way the Voice judges are. I’ll watch again but have no expectations that the show will produce a new star.

  • Anonymous

    ITA. The Voice was fun, entertaining and had some talented contestants, but the charm was all about the judges and how great  their chemistry was and, unlike x factor, the judges didn’t fight all the time and neither sabotaged other judges acts to benefit their own, wich gave the show a lighter and fun approach.
    I’ll watch it again this year because I do like the show, but they should give a little more support for its contestants.

  • http://twitter.com/youtweetmetoo it’s me

    I loved the VOICE!  Xenia, Dia and Javier all have great albums!  I am looking forward to watching it in the new year!  X Factor=no; The Voice=YES! 

  • Anonymous

    They dont even have a single at any radio station, so its clear they dont care about their alum.

    Javier Colon’s song “As Long as We Got Love” is #50 on HAC currently.

  • Anonymous

    How long can a show survive that is entertaining only because of the judges? That seems like it would get stale very quickly unless they are changing the judges every few years.

  • sd34567

    The Voice will kick off its second season with all four judges performing a Prince medley.

    Uh-oh.  Prince should probably have his lawyers on stand-by. 

    Why can’t they just do each other’s songs?  The best performance they ever did was “Crazy”.  What’s wrong with them doing a Christina song?  Or a Maroon 5 song?  Or a Blake Shelton song?  Or a Cee-Lo song?  Or a song from when Cee-Lo was with Goodie Mob?  Come on.

  • Anonymous

    Carson: “Those albums are arguably better than those in the top 50, so it’s all perspective.

    Whose beach has Carson Daly been sticking his head in the sand? Either the music was not very good and/or no one cared combined with the lack of promo.  Carson didn’t seem to get much of a boost to his career like the judges did. Carson is no Ryan, Cat or Tom Bergeron and only slightly better than Steve Jones.

  • Stavros

    I remember Lacey Brown (AI S10) tweeting that she was going to audition for the Voice…I wonder how far she got…

  • Anonymous

    I’m watching The Voice again this year. It was entertaining and they had some good music. I enjoyed it a lot more than Idol. But having said that, all the judges on these shows are thinking about themselves before anything else. All of them are self serving and in the end, their careers all got a boost that certainly benefited them financially. I don’t even remember one performance off either Idol or The Voice last year, that was even memorable. Both are entertaining shows, but the judges hog the spotlight most of the time. 

  • http://twitter.com/KariannHart Kariann Hart

    As long as the viewing audience like/love the judges, The Voice and the X-Factor will continue to succeed.

  • Anonymous

    I think the problem in sales is again we didn’t really get to know the contestants or care about them.  The Idols come off the show with a fan base that is kept alive by a long hopefully successful tour.  There are thousands of talented artist out their as good or better then anyone of the performers from the top 10 that come off any of these shows.  We as consumers are drawn in by more then talent and that is what AI does the best of these shows it draws us in.  I have bought Lauren”s,Scotty and James album because I am invested in seeing them succeed.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    ” The day after the finale, they can just sweep the contestant out with the confetti and start planning for next season.”

    I believe that was the plan the first few seasons of Idol and TPTB were stunned that some of them not only sold in the millions but at least one non-winner did as well as the winners and they didn’t just disappear as planned. 

  • http://twitter.com/lorismile1 Lori

    I love the concept of the Voice so much more than Idol but the show isn’t about finding new music.  It’s about the judges.  

    Does anyone really think Maroon 5 and Christina would have done Moves Like Jagger if they weren’t on the show together?  It’s more about their own careers than the contestants.

  • Anonymous

    They make the show all about the judges with the contestants as an afterthought, and then are shocked, shocked when the judges have big hits and the contestants don’t show well.  Maybe “We can’t control everything that happens in the record industry.”, but that’s something they CAN control.  

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    “Does anyone really think Maroon 5 and Christina would have done Moves Like Jagger if they weren’t on the show together?”

    Moves Like Jaggar would have been even better without Christina.

  • Anonymous

    I’m going to watch the first several episodes with the mentors (thank you DVR) and since I’m on the West Coast, I’ll cheat and see the Voice thread to see if there will be songs/ performances I like to see.

    Interesting discussion, so I gather that talent alone does not sell albums if there is no support from the label. Hmmm, good to know.

  • http://twitter.com/Justin_J9 Justin

    Adam: I trust the show more than I trust the record industry at this point.
    lol of course, his career was down the sh*tter before he joined the panel and all of a sudden he has one of the biggest songs of the year and decent album sales. 

  • Anonymous

    Despite the failures of season one, I think the concept of the voice has a lot of potential. Of the three big singing competitions, it’s the only one that attempts to strive for authenticity (disclosing itune sales, “on the spot” decisions) and it places the focus to where it should be. Granted, the audience connection and post-show management needs work, but I think that despite how the interview may have come across, they know that things need to change – everyone knows that two consecutive seasons of lukewarm winners does not bode well for the future of the show. 

    And while I’m far from a mainstream music fan, I do think that Dia and Xenia have  uniquely beautiful and seriously underrated voices. It’s a shame they weren’t given the airtime to showcase their new singles on post-show circuits, but I think their talent sustain the credibility and aims of the show.

  • Kirsten

    I believe that was the plan the first few seasons of Idol

    I’m not so sure. The entire premise, repeated over and over in those early years, was that the winner was to get a $1M recording contract. Will Young, the original Pop Idol winner, sold a staggering 403,027 of his single in the first DAY (that is not a typo) and over 1M in its first week. His album sold 188K in it’s first week in the UK and he’s still making music today. He has a new album coming out this year.

    If they didn’t think Idols would be a success when they started Pop Idol, they might have suspected it would be true by the time they started American Idol.

    Idol certainly did a lot more to promote their winners (starting year one) than NBC/The Voice has done. The Voice was one of NBC’s brightest stars last year, so why couldn’t they make sure that Javier and Dia got to promote their albums the week they released them on the Today show and other related NBC programs? Javier went on a week later and I don’t think Dia ever got to go on since her album was released. Just little things like that might have helped. Use the show’s publicity department to keep Javier and Dia in the news over the summer. Heck, feature them in the ads for the new season.

    It may have all come to the same result if they had tried to promote those two, but not having really tried leaves them open to a lot of criticism and questioning of their show model (and certainly should take the wind out of the sails of the judges claiming that their show is the best for contestants).

  • Anonymous

    The only thing the Voice has accomplished is boost the judges careers…. not to mention their egos!!!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    I see where you are going but I disagree.

    “The entire premise, repeated over and over in those early years, was that the winner was to get a $1M recording contract.”

    True, but I believe that the winner was meant to quickly put out a souvenir album and then move aside in time for the next year’s crop.

  • Anonymous

    If that was the case then why have the idols sign a multi-year recording & management contract if they were just going to sweep them aside with the new season. It’s pretty clear they had a long term vision for their signees.

  • Anonymous

    The Voice promoted itself as wanting to find the next superstar. Turned out  should have promoted itself as a show that wanted to spotlight and boost the careers of the judges.

    It was entertaining and I thought the contestants were all pretty talented, although it was clear that many of them would be hard to market, so I’m not surprised the albums have tanked, especially considering the lack of promo.

    I might watch this season, but from the comments of the judges, it doesn’t sound like much is going to change in terms of trying to actually focus on the contestants rather than on Adam, Christina, Blake and Cee Lo.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    “If that was the case then why have the idols sign a multi-year recording
    & management contract if they were just going to sweep them aside
    with the new season.”

    Insurance. If by some fluke they break out, the contract prevents them from signing elsewhere. If they are signed for 5 album options and no further albums are made or promoted, the contract prevents them from signing elsewhere. It gives 19R total control.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    “it doesn’t sound like much is going to change in terms of trying to
    actually focus on the contestants rather than on Adam, Christina, Blake
    and Cee Lo.”

    Not only that but 8 more auxilliary judges have been added to promote their careers. The contestants are just filler.

  • Kirsten

    If they are signed for 5 album options and no further albums are made
    or promoted, the contract prevents them from signing elsewhere. It gives
    19R total control.

    Although 19R would no doubt like it to be that way, happily the world does not work like that. At least, not in the US. Even if you want to, you cannot sign away all your rights.

    Each contract varies a little, but there is a time limit for decisions to be made and products to be delivered (which can be re-negotiated by all parties as things go on). Typically, the artist will have a time limit (usually 6 months to a year) to come up with an album from the time of the advance/go-ahead. Then the label will have a time limit (usually 3-6 months) to decide on whether to release what the artist came up with. After the release, there is another time limit during which the label must decide whether or not to exercise the option for the next album and start the entire process over again.

    While the label can tie somebody up for a time, at some point, they do have to cut them lose. There have been all sorts of games played (Curb releasing “Best Ofs” to keep Tim McGraw under contract and others giving crap-o-la songs to the label to force their hand into releasing an artist (sometimes, there is language to prevent that)), a good entertainment lawyer will try to make sure that you don’t end up in that position. The courts would take a dim view of tying somebody up in a contract that wouldn’t either pay them or allow them to seek employment elsewhere.

  • Karen C

    I think the problem in sales is again we didn’t really get to know the contestants or care about them.  The Idols come off the show with a fan base that is kept alive by a long hopefully successful tour. 

    I think so too, and I think a big part of this was the show wasn’t on for as long.  I think one of of the things that really builds fanbases is the number of weeks of voting rounds the show has, or at least they have more individual performances.   By the time someone wins Idol, they have at least 12-14 weeks of individual performances (depending on the format of the season), plus the audition week,and a week for Hollywood week, plus the chair episodes. But on the Voice last year they only had about 6 rounds of individual performance. It sounds like there’s going to be more this year though.

    And the thing is there were contestants that I really liked, but would have liked to have seen much more.   I also didn’t like the battle rounds because there were several that were cut that I really liked.

    I do agree also about there being more promo for Idol contestants, and I think the title of being the current American Idol carries some weight also.

  • Karen C

    I agree that it’s probably in case they are successful, so they can’t be signed by another label, because if they were just interested in building someone long term, they wouldn’t have dropped so many that didn’t do  well, they would have just kept promoting them.

  • http://twitter.com/tinawinabina Tinawina

    I am really disappointed by this show. I got a big kick out of its first season, thought it was a fun show with a lot of potential. I was really looking forward to seeing how they improved The Voice this year… until those albums came out. I don’t care what anyone says, NO ONE tried with those acts. The show has done nothing to help, their management and labels, NBC… nothing. Maybe Dia’s A&R person tried, and I say maybe because Dia could have got those cool collabs herself since she’s a veteran. But other than that, nobody gave a frak.

    That totally ruins things for me. I don’t ask that all the contestants become stars off these things, but they won a prize and they should actually get a real shot. These people never had a chance. A record is meaningless without promo, and everyone involved knows that.

    The only one I have any respect for right now is Blake.

    Unless there’s a big push for the alums planned to coincide with the return of The Voice, I don’t see myself getting invested in this show this year. I might catch an audition show or two but I’ll stick to watching some of the videos on here outside that. I feel sorry for the contestants going on that show.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    The reason all those protections were put in place by the courts was because the labels are in it for the labels and the artists needed a way to escape from their strangle hold. Prince changing his name is an example of an artist in the grip of a contract that gave the label rights to everything including his name.

    The label can still tie up an artist for many years. All they need to do is stall. Say the artist has 6 months to record an album, the label then gets 6 months to release it or release the artist from the contract. The label doesn’t want to do either thing so they send the artist back in the studio to record again and shelve the rejected album, there goes another year with the artist tied to the label and no new music. Next the label stalls by releasing the 2nd submission with no support and it tanks. The label orders artist to try again. This way they can tie up an artist and still ensure that their career tanks. After the 5 options are frittered away the label drops the artist citing poor sales.

    Yes I am a cynic.

  • Anonymous

    The Voice was one of NBC’s brightest stars last year, so why couldn’t they make sure that Javier and Dia got to promote their albums the week they released them on the Today show and other related NBC programs?

    Maybe because producers of the show are skilled in, you know, producing a reality tv program?
    The task that has nothing to do with managing career of a singer.
    They may be at fault for not putting more of a focus on the contestants during the show, or not including past winners into commercials for next season.
    But and all the things people are objecting to (not enough appearances, not enough promotion to the radio etc…) is a job of artists label and management.

    People responsible for “The Voice – a tv program” are doing exactly what they suppose to do at time – gearing up for a new season.

    UMG and respective management companies are the one who suppose to deal with developing carriers of inspiring singers now.

  • Kirsten

    Maybe because producers of the show are skilled in, you know, producing a reality tv program?

    Maybe they could make sure that they develop co-agreements with people who do know how to market artists so that winning The Voice means something. That’s what Idol did.

    Seriously, if you are a struggling artist and did a level headed analysis of Idol and The Voice, which show would you go on? I think the only time The Voice comes out ahead is if you are too old for Idol.

    At some point, surely the artists will realize that being on The Voice is a road to obscurity. Unless the producers/owners of the show/NBC see some value in having viable contestants and making sure they have a possibility of a career, otherwise, viable contestants would have to be as dumb as a post to be on the show given the alternatives.

    It could be that TPTB think that the contestants are just window dressing and the show is all about the judges (so even if they get crap contestants, it doesn’t matter). They could be right. At some point, though, you’d think that the judges would be self-aware enough to feel guilty about pretending that the show is about the contestants and puffing themselves going onto the talk shows claiming that their show is the best for contestants. At least just talk about how entertaining it is for the audience to see new and different artists. Stop patting yourself on the back about something you know is not true.

  • Anonymous
    “The entire premise, repeated over and over in those early years, was that the winner was to get a $1M recording contract.”

    True, but I believe that the winner was meant to quickly put out a souvenir album and then move aside in time for the next year’s crop.

    I think if that were the case, then people like Taylor Hicks and Lee DeWyze wouldn’t be treated the way they have.  Hicks was great entertainment value, both on the show and on the tour, and his “souvenir” album sold well.  But he wasn’t seen as an artist the label could continue to sell and he was dropped quickly.

    But Kelly was treated as a valuable commodity from the moment the confetti fell.  Not only was her album well-produced, but the producers quickly developed a movie as a vehicle for her.  Yeah, it was terrible, but it wasn’t in the original prize package.  In addition, Justin Guarini was signed to a recording contract.  That wasn’t ever a given, but the label thought it would be silly to throw away his fans — since there were millions of votes for him as well as Kelly.

    I think the big difference is that Clive Davis was involved in American Idol at the beginning, and he’s definitely a music guy.  Mark Burnett does some great reality shows, and he treats his subjects well, but he’s not really looking for a singer he can make millions from.  He really is just looking to create enough drama to engage the audience for a few weeks.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    I agree that Taylor sold well but the contracts and the producers have evolved over the years. What was true season one already changed by season 2 and so on.

    “But [Taylor] wasn’t seen as an artist the label could continue to sell and he was dropped quickly.”

    I’ve never seen this stated by the label. I think its a meme developed inside the bubble.

  • http://twitter.com/AdamsArmyGirl Linda Vastardis

    Have to agree, and I know I’m biased on this and I admit it … but …

    Ever since Levine ‘dissed’ Adam Lambert last year re: WWFM, that was the ‘end’ of Levine for me.  He is arrogant, cocky, narcissistic and egomaniacal.  Other than that, he’s terrific!  ;)

  • http://twitter.com/AdamsArmyGirl Linda Vastardis

    I enjoyed The Voice also last year.  I found it refreshingly ‘different’ from Idol in format and the ‘gimmicks’ were also fun.  But I do agree it’s more about the celeb judges than anything else as it was on XFactor.  For some reason, though, I didn’t mind it as much on The Voice as I loathed it on  XFactor.  I found XF so melodramatic, manipulative and way too ‘glitzy’ in overproduction.

    I’ll be tuning in to the Voice though … if only to see Levine squirm and ‘fail’ … I like Blake Shelton a lot, Xtina’s a caricature and Cee-Lo?  Well, whenever I don’t like something he says, I can always start singing “F*ck You” and get away with it!  :)

  • http://twitter.com/MissGolightly22 No Thanks

    They BETTER start caring how the winners do post show, or this show will die a quick death.  At the very least, the talent pool might dry up if it seems like it’s not worth going on the show.

    At least AI and the X-Factor have a vested interest in their winner (and other finalists) succeeding.

    ETA: Say what you will about Simon Cowell, but you can bet your sweet bippy that he will pull out ALL the stops to make Melanie a success. Because he know his cash cow X-Factor show will die if she isn’t (or at the least SOMEONE from that show). American Idol would NOT be on Season 11 and going strong if Kelly Clarkson wasn’t such a success.

  • Anonymous

    Taylor posted right after that split with J and stated it was mutual decision.  He never was, or could be molded by what they wanted for the show – a pop singer…. but I wouldn’t be surprised if HE actually initiated the split. The label didn’t really live up to their end of the bargain - e.g. promo, video, etc.  He pretty much used the show to get his name out there and then went on his merry way.  Probably pissed off TPB and they washed their hands of him and visa versa – at least for a few years.  As it turned out, it was a good move, professionally, and he seems happy with his decision.  He seems like the kind of guy who wanted his own power to guide his own career the way he wanted and give up a certain percentage of sales for that right. Gutsy, for sure.

  • Anonymous

    As others have mentioned, I wonder how long big audiences will want to watch the same four judges do their same schtick. I found it getting a bit predictable last season, and I didn’t even watch all that much of the show. Are these four really compelling enough to sustain people’s interest again?

  • Ringo

    I find it hard to believe anyone expected the four judges to continue to mentor or promote their performers after the show.  Like Randy, JLo and Stephen are out helping any of the idols?  These are four very talented artists who have their own lives and career.   The fact that Blake may be helping Dia only shows what a mensch he is and how supportive country artists can be.

    I also wouldnt have expected Dia and Javier to sell alot of records.  Their music is pleasant but not all that distinctive.  They each sing in a pretty crowded genre and unless they an offer some pretty good effing music, they re not going to stand out.  Their are decades of great songs and performances available to me and unless something new really stands our or touches me, I’m not buying.  Further, their albums were rushed out pretty quickly so its hard to trun out quality music, in my opinion.

    So I will watch if the talent is there.  I will likely skip the dueling duets because that usually is crap performances.  I’ll enjoy the banter of he judges, complaint about Carson’s tinman delivery and wait to the final rounds to see what emerges.  Same as last year.

  • http://twitter.com/MissGolightly22 No Thanks

    I don’t think anyone said the JUDGES need to take care of the contestants post show, but the SHOW needs to.   They better set up management and a game plan to promote their winners, otherwise, what the hell is the point of the show?  It will end up dying out.  At least X-Factor and Idol are putting their money where their mouths are.

  • Tess

    Personally, I think a label is in the business to make money and to play the game to keep an artist from moving on by “stalling” them for years makes little or no economic sense.  If they think the artist is so good that another label will sweep them up…why wouldn’t they be wanting the artist to record for them and make them money.  Besides, laws protect artists from becoming indentured servants to the label…if a label is going to “keep” sending a singer back to the drawing board they do need to pay them…that is why there is an upfront payment to the artist when they start recording.  I believe for Idolettes that amount keeps increasing with each record…and Idolettes don’t need to return it if the record label renigs (sp) on the album once the two parties agree to move forward.  So your example just wouldn’t work in the real world.

  • Karen C

    Christina’s quote of:

     “[The Voice] really gives artists that aren’t so mainstream or commercially approachable [a chance].

    The thing is I think Idol does this too.  A lot of those that have done well were not getting contracts, and most would not be considered mainstream. That’s why it’s amazing that some have sold so much, because they got a following from the show.

    I think that the X Factor had more that would be considered pop.

  • Anonymous

    There were a lot of promises made during the show by the judges about working with the contestants post-show that for the most part were not kept. Blake was probably the closest to fulfilling their promises followed probably by Cee Lo.

  • Karen C

    Just because an album is in the top 50 doesn’t mean it’s good, at least not to all people.   Some prefer music that wouldn’t be considered mainstream.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “True, but I believe that the winner was meant to quickly put out a
    souvenir album and then move aside in time for the next year’s crop.”

    I totally agree.  If anyone managed to persist beyond that, or even establish themselves as a solo artist (like Kelly did), it was all gravy and certainly not expected.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    Multi-year/CD contracts are at the option of the label, aren’t they?

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “Maybe because producers of the show are skilled in, you know, producing a reality tv program?
    The task that has nothing to do with managing career of a singer.
    They
    may be at fault for not putting more of a focus on the contestants
    during the show, or not including past winners into commercials for next
    season.
    But and all the things people are objecting to (not enough
    appearances, not enough promotion to the radio etc…) is a job of
    artists label and management.”

    Exactly and this is the same as those involved in producing Idol.  Remember when Ken Warwick publicly stated in an interview that he was responsible for the show, and once the show ended, any responsibility he had for the contestants ended as well? 

  • http://twitter.com/MissGolightly22 No Thanks

    I disagree.  The show was Simon Fuller’s idea and he’s always been in the business of discovering and developing pop acts.  I really believe that was his goal.  To use TV as a way of doing that.  To be able to make money in the process AND launch a pop star.  If he didn’t, he couldn’t have gotten Sony and Clive Davis on board.  And Clive wouldn’t have taken launching Kelly so seriously.

    The goals was always to have a successful TV show AND successful pop acts to make them money year round.

  • Ringo

    Wait!  Are you saying we shouldn’t measure artistic success by commercial success?  That, say, a Katy Perry album is not better than a Corinne Bailey Rae album even if it sold twice as many?  That sounds all wrong to me.  The next thing you will be saying is that the best film of the year is not the best selling at the box office.  And I totally agree with you. :)

  • fuzzywuzzy

    What has Cee Lo done for his contestants?

  • Anonymous

    I believe that was the plan the first few seasons of Idol and TPTB were stunned that some of them not only sold in the millions but at least one non-winner did as well as the winners and they didn’t just disappear as planned.

    It was the plan even after the first season as far as Clive Davis was concerned.  Clive always looked at AI alums, aside from Fantasia, as a way to make a quick buck.  Until Daughtry, he pretty much molded them into who he wanted them to be, even Kelly.  He didn’t see anyone as legitimate artists, and was not interested in helping them become legitimate artists.  That’s why 19 probably deserves some credit, even though it seems like they didn’t have the infrastructure of the record label in place until well after the first season.

  • Anonymous

    Christina’s quote of: “[The Voice] really gives artists that aren’t so mainstream or commercially approachable [a chance].

    The thing is I think Idol does this too.

    Wasn’t Beverly one of Christina’s acts?  I agree that the exposure alone can open up opportunities that these contestants never would have had, especially for someone who is around Beverly’s age, or who is in a niche genre.  But, it’s hard to take Christina’s words seriously, when they haven’t done anything to help Beverly.  I think Christina tweeted about her album the day that it was released, but that’s about it.

  • Tess

    What is a legitimate artist?

  • Anonymous

    Did he not work with 
    Vicci Martinez? I could be wrong.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think that the Voice was aired long enough for people to be invested in contestants the way Idol audiences are. I really believe that fan investment is one of the main things driving the first album sales of idol alumni.  I listened to both Dia’s and Javier’s albums and I would agree that they were very good quality. I liked Dia’s a little more, but I love Javier’s voice too. The producers just have to work on better promotion, but that may have been related to available funds.

    I really enjoyed The Voice despite its many flaws. I found that the average quality of singing was far better than American Idol and X factor. The high singing quality can be both a blessing and a curse when it comes to ratings. American Idol and America’s Got Talent appeal to a wider viewing population because they showcase both quality performances as well as the trainwreck performances. Another parallel is Dancing with Stars vs. So You Think you Can Dance. If talent and quality were the only attraction in shows like this, then SYTYCD would have much higher ratings. 

    So I guess what I’m trying to say is that I appreciate the premise of shows like the Voice and SYTYCD and don’t see their lower ratings as a failure. I think they should definitely work more on promoting their artists and they should take away some of the voting power from the judges. However, I agree with Levine about the record industry. I think an artists success is unpredictable and the music industry doesn’t always reward the most deserving artists.  I will definitely be watching The Voice when it airs again. 

  • Anonymous

    What is a legitimate artist?

    In this case, it’s someone who makes a name for him or herself because of the music, and not because they were on a reality tv show.  Clive wanted to release albums that profited from the alums being on AI, it’s why the songs on so many of the albums don’t seem to fit the alums, and sound a lot alike.  It goes along with how some people see them, it’s a manufactured sound that marks them as coming from AI, and songs that are meant to appeal to the largest demo that watches the show.  

    Going back to the talk about A&R, there wasn’t a lot of that going on under Clive.  He wasn’t trying to come up with songs that would establish the alums as artist, or that fit their strengths, he was trying to come up with songs that would show them as products of American Idol, and that would satisfy American Idol fans.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    I know that Cee Lo mentored Vicci, but I meant what has he done for her post-The Voice to help/promote her?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_BHCD4X7GHJ23SMJ2M2RCQUSNUM Pat

    Thats the reason Adam went on idol and it absolutely worked for him.
    I was not a fan of idol,I just became a fan of Adam’s but this irks me because the Voice did not do what they are claiming but Idol actually did.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S7SESS3YJTJIQGNSE7PL5YUEGQ Silas Warner

    What was so great about Idol is that it did support the winners for at least their first year [before Taylor] but these other shows, most notably The Voice, have shown that they are just another Star Search.

  • Anonymous

    Maroon 5 has always had decent album sales (all of their albums have sold platinum). They regularly produce hits and and have been nominated for Grammys almost every year. Yes, their prior albums did not have the massive success like Songs about Jane, but I would not define that as being in the sh*tter, especially given their genre of music. In fact, none of The Voice judges were suffering in the music industry IMO. 

    An example of a musical career being in the shitter would be J Lo prior to American Idol and unlike Maroon 5,  the majority of her music actually sucked. Surprisingly, I loved her “On the Floor” Single, but her AI appearance certainly didn’t hurt. So I’m not seeing how The Voice is any worse than Idol when it comes to judge promotion. 

  • http://twitter.com/MissGolightly22 No Thanks

    Exactly.  Clive wanted profitable pop acts.  That’s all he’s ever wanted.  He looked at AI as a marketing tool to help launch new acts.  He might not have thought of them as “true artists” (whatever that’s supposed to mean) but he certainly viewed them as more than novelty acts.

  • Karen C

    Thats the reason Adam went on idol and it absolutely worked for him.
    I was not a fan of idol,I just became a fan of Adam’s but this irks me because the Voice did not do what they are claiming but Idol actually did.

    This is true, Idol has been able to do this with Adam and several others, including Kelly Clarkson, who was turned down for record contracts, David Cook,  and actually most of the others that have done well, but wouldn’t be considered mainstream.  

  • Karen C

    Mark Burnett does some great reality shows, and he treats his subjects well, but he’s not really looking for a singer he can make millions from.  He really is just looking to create enough drama to engage the audience for a few weeks.

    This is a very good point, that the producers of Idol and X Factor are music executives, while Mark Burnett is a tv producer.  Even with his Rockstar series, not even the winners of the show did that well, even though they were working with established bands. 

  • Karen C

    Seriously, if you are a struggling artist and did a level headed analysis of Idol and The Voice, which show would you go on? I think the only time The Voice comes out ahead is if you are too old for Idol.

    I would go on Idol first, because of the larger audience, and because it is more proven.  If I were older, I probably would consider the X Factor over the Voice because of the larger contract. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_BHCD4X7GHJ23SMJ2M2RCQUSNUM Pat

    Its not any worse re judge promotion now but the major difference is that AI follows up and there are success stories every year.
    Scotty is doing fantastically isn’t he?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_BHCD4X7GHJ23SMJ2M2RCQUSNUM Pat

    Well Kelly was still only 19 but Adam had banged on a lot of doors since he moved to LA at 18.

  • Kylee

    I remember her later saying she was joking after that and she said that because she wanted to meet Blake Shelton and be on his team. But she later said she was joking.

  • Kylee

    I found that the average quality of singing was far better than American Idol and X factor.

    I thought most of the performances on The Voice were very average and nothing special.

  • Chris

    I get your point, that a lot of the best music is not double, triple+ platinum.

    But even to get Grammy attention to go the Corrine route, you need some promotion and connections with the “right” people.  It doesn’t sound like the Voice contestants have that just yet.  

  • http://www.facebook.com/masewallace Mase Wallace

    this might put aspiring singers off from auditioning in the future if nothing changes with the show

  • http://www.facebook.com/masewallace Mase Wallace

    idol x factor and then agt, in that order i would only tryout for the voice as a last ditch effort if none of the others worked out

  • http://www.facebook.com/masewallace Mase Wallace

    imagine them doing misery or stronger,can you say awesome

  • http://twitter.com/KariannHart Kariann Hart

    Everything already said is so true. I have mentioned before that the X-Factor and The Voice are competitors. Reading the comments made, it is obvious this is true. Both have similar views towards the value of the judges over the contestants.

    “Telling someone they were terrible doesn’t get us anywhere.”

    Now, gee I wonder who he was talking about? The irony of this is that Javier and Dia are truly talented, but they need support from the show. If they are in the same time slot as DWTS, I will probably go with the dance show.

  • Anonymous

    Exactly.  Clive wanted profitable pop acts.  That’s all he’s ever wanted.  He looked at AI as a marketing tool to help launch new acts.  He might not have thought of them as “true artists” (whatever that’s supposed to mean) but he certainly viewed them as more than novelty acts.

    Trying to just capitalize off of them being on AI is my definition of viewing them as novelty acts. 

  • Karen C

    Yes, and I think even if at first they were viewed more as novelty acts in the beginning, I don’t think they are so much anymore.  I think this changed when some former contestants became stars with some staying power, and getting some major awards.  

  • Karen C

    They still are getting recording contracts out of it, though and they could continue with a career in music even if they aren’t major artists.

  • Anonymous

    I kind of doubt they were actually viewed as novelty acts.  Kelly proved they can be more than just a novelty act and she was the first one to win.  Certainly there were some who ended up being novelty acts but Clive had to have been smart enough to know that some would make it out of the bubble.  With that in mind, Clive probably could tell who might break out of the bubble and who wouldn’t and maybe put more effort into some than others.  

  • http://twitter.com/MissGolightly22 No Thanks

    It’s not my definition.  When I think “novelty act” I think like…Rebecca Black or William Hung.