The Voice Announces Season 3 Casting Schedule

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The Voice is casting for it’s 3rd season, set to air fall 2012!  Casting calls will take place:

Chicago – March 3
New York -  March 10
Atlanta – March 17
Los Angeles – March 31

Read the press release:

“The Voice” is the number one new series of the season, featuring the country’s best unknown artists and four of the biggest names in music; Coaches Adam Levine, Blake Shelton, Cee Lo Green and Christina Aguilera. Last season, “The Voice” became one of the most successful new television shows in years, averaging almost 13 million viewers.

The search to find artists for “The Voice” starts this spring across the nation, and we are coming to a town near you. Prove to us that YOU are The Voice!

We are looking for solo artists and duos that perform all types of music: pop, rock, R&B, hip-hop, alternative, latin, country, blues, indie. We want to know your story and why you are The Voice.

Auditions for “The Voice” will be sweeping the nation beginning March 2012!

To audition you must be a legal resident of the United States, be 15 years of age or older, and meet all other eligibility requirements.

 
  • Anonymous

    I wonder how many people will actually try out now that they have seen how the finalists/winner do post show?

  • Anonymous

    I think that an unknown, little known, or forgotten singer will sell his/her soul to get on TV.  It’s such a long bumpy road to the finals, much less winning, that they don’t even think about where the songs will come from when covers don’t cut it anymore. 

  • http://twitter.com/KariannHart Kariann Hart

    I would imagine there will be 2 or 3 Idol contestants trying out.  The Voice producers would love that, especially if they have a great voice!

  • Kirsten

    To audition you must be a legal resident of the United States, be 15 years of age or older,

    …and not really be interested in having a musical career.

  • Anonymous

    Of this season’s finalists, how many were gotten from this sort of open casting call, and how many were recruited in targeted casting?  

  • Hazehel

    I wonder how many people will actually try out now that they have seen how the finalists/winner do post show?

    I suspect the show will try to make more of an effort to promote the next winner.  Perhaps with the show being somewhat more popular this season, the contestants can sell more this time.

    The viewers somehow don’t get invested to The Voice’s contestants as much as Idol’s.   It’s probably what they do at the voting rounds in the Voice vs Idol, although I don’t paid much attention to The Voice so I don’t really know why.

  • superfudge

    Adam Levine was on Howard Stern a few days ago and they talked about post show success and how it takes the right song at the right time to make a hit. I think he mentioned something about Kelly and Since U Been Gone. He said he had just talked to Javier and stuff. I have a feeling Adam is waiting for Javier’s contract to expire with Universal Republic to sign him to his new label 222.

  • Kirsten

    The viewers somehow don’t get invested to The Voice’s contestants as much as Idol’s.

    The problem is the format.

    We rarely get to see the contestants, we get even fewer chances to vote for them, there are no growth arcs and they are overshadowed by the judges.

    This year, we get to see the contestants once in February during the auditions rounds and once in March during the battle rounds. The first round ends up with 48 contestants and the battle rounds with 24. If it runs like last year, we will then get to see each contestant once in 3 weeks leaving us with 12 contestants (8 contestants a week with 4 surviving). In 11 weeks, we’ve seen eacg Voice contestant 3 times.

    Last year, we only saw the contestants perform for 5 nights (audition, battle round, top 16, top 8 and top 4). They came fully formed on their audition night and didn’t change much after that. The judges overshadowed them throughout. This year, the battle rounds will also allow the mentors to overshadow them. I’m not sure how they will stretch out the elimination of the top 12. Voters don’t get to start voting until after the battle rounds the last week in March.

  • Kirsten

    I think he mentioned something about Kelly and Since U Been Gone.

    Kelly had hits before that. It takes more than just the right song at the right time. You need promo support as well.

    I have a feeling Adam is waiting for Javier’s contract to expire with Universal Republic to sign him to his new label 222

    How is he going to make magic happen? A year after the guy has faded from most people’s memory.

    Adam talks a good game on the talk shows, but I notice on his own show, he claims that he won last year and doesn’t give any credit to Javier. I think we see the real Adam in the unguarded moments and the person Adam would like to be seen to be in the controlled interviews.

  • Hazehel

    Given that I have never watched an entire show of The Voice, just watched casually the videos posted here, my perception of the show is probably somewhat skewed and not to be taken too seriously.  But for what it’s worth, I thought that the drama of the judges in their Star Trek chairs somehow detracted the attention from contestants.  I think I have seen most of the contestants so far, but I can’t remember them now.  There was one contestant I like from I think the first episode, but even then I have no recollection what he looks like.  (In Idol audition, there are usually a few people from the first auditions I remember even when I was watching casually.)  The judges are given a lot of prominence, but so is the X-Factor, and their contestants do extremely well sales wise.  That leaves the chair, it seems to be the star of the show.    

    As you said, perhaps a reason the viewers don’t get attached to them is because they see the contestants fewer number of times, but then America’s Got Talent the contestants only appear a few times as well, so perhaps they are the ones to compare to?

  • Anonymous

    I think a good number of musicians are confident enough in their abilities to say “Well, the Voice hasn’t produced a star yet – but why can’t I be the one that breaks the trend?”  For as long as we have starving artists looking for any break they can get, you will have contestants trying out for this show.  I would think Javier’s bank account has gotten at least a bit bigger due to being on the show, and winning it.
    The judges and the competition between them is definitely a big part of what makes the show work – NBC is not going to decide to suddenly downplay that part of the process.
    I do agree that not having as much exposure as the Idols do could contribute to less overall success.  And yes, when you look at Idol contestants from the time they audition to the point they are voted off (or win), we get to see more of a growth arc over the polished performers on The Voice.
    And it looks like Blake is more than willing to drop Xenia’s and Dia’s names whenever he has a chance on the show – to be exact, he’s the only one who mentions his team from last season.  I think Blake genuinely would like to see them succeed; but it takes more than just promotion.  You need good material and loads of patience.   It may be too soon to say that the Voice has flopped in producing stars – the jury may still be out on that.
     

  • Anonymous

    Hmmmm…I’ll be watching, I’m sure. Still don’t think it’s a good idea.

    It’s really hard for me to make any long-term observations about The Voice since this is only the second season.  I didn’t get invested in anyone last year because I really was just testing the waters.  I liked Javier Colon well enough, but he wasn’t the greatest thing since sliced bread, and I’m not sure that any amount of promotion would have made him that.  Maybe this wasn’t a case of not-invested so much as not-interested.

    Some people are momentary stars, some people are longterm stars, and some people are popular just as long as the show is on television.  This is true for any talent competition on television.

    I can sing the praises of American Idol, but really, outside of the select winners, which are the handful that we *really* remember?  The rest of it is all good, entertaining TV.

  • http://twitter.com/tinawinabina Tinawina

    I absolutely, totally agree that The Voice’s format is the issue. Not only do the contestants only appear once during battle rounds, the judges are still very central to the process. On Idol, during Hollywood/Vegas week the contestants are front and center. Not only is it possible to hear them sing multiple times (sudden death, group round, solos with band, Vegas round and sing for your life) we also see a lot of the prep that goes into those performances and we get to see them interact with each other. By the time the voting starts, there are at least a handful that have become actual people the audience feels like they “know”. Plus on The Voice, people get voted off in big blocks, on Idol it is one at a time, so the process stretches out so long that by the end you’ve had plenty of time to get a sense of who the last ones standing are. Idol judges have moved from the stars of the show, to the antagonists the heroes have to overcome in order to win the prize. On The Voice, the contestants are the vehicle by which the heroes (the judges) win the prize. And that’s the difference.

    I do think that can be overcome post show. The contestants just need real promotion. But Universal is not the most consistent label for that kind of thing. As much as everyone disses Sony, they would have done a much better job with Javier, Dia and Xenia. Honestly I think all three would have been better off at a dedicated indie like the one James is signed to.

    I hope they do something about it this year. 1. It really is the one thing stopping me from getting into the show and 2. The contestants deserve better.

  • superfudge

    Make magic happen? The same way you market a new artist. Not everyone comes from reality shows.

    Adam was the winning coach last year? Not sure why there’s a problem with saying that. There’s nothing disrespectful to Javier in saying that. People are grasping at straws with that one.

  • Anonymous

    There’s nothing disrespectful in saying that, but there IS something disrespectful in saying “Adam won last season” on the show over and over again without ever mentioning Javier’s name or his music.

  • superfudge

    He doesn’t mention Javier’s name or album because these episodes were taped before his album came out.

  • Anonymous

    So The Voice will go head to head against the X Factor and won’t be on this time of year anymore?

  • Anonymous

    “I wonder how many people will actually try out now that they have seen how the finalists/winner do post show?”

    Probably a lot. The Voice is positive exposure, and just like Idol, each winner will have a different experience. Personally, if I were a singer/songwriter, I would pick the Voice over American Idol any day. There’s just something appealing about a show that strongly encourages individuality and originality. It results in more “artistic cred” for their contestants, giving the impression no one has to “sell out”. This perception may or may not be true, but right now, it’s a strong selling point of the show. I’ve always felt that winning American Idol comes with a price that not all artists are willing to pay. Nothing elaborates this better than its many “definitions” in the urban dictionary:
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=american%20idol 

    As for Idol alumni being more successful than Voice alumni:  The reality is that unless you’re an avid Idol fan, post-Idol success goes relatively unnoticed. Most people think that the last successful Idol winner happened over 5 years ago. And yes, Idol winners have a very loyal fanbase, but the Idol fandom can be a double-edged sword, particularly for the guys. For this, and many other reasons, I think that The Voice producers are wise to pave their own path and not copy the Idol formula. They just have to work out the kinks. The best thing that The Voice could (and should) do for their season 1 finalists at this point, would be to invite those with albums to perform this season.  I just listened to Xenia’s album and I think her songs would resonate well with the audience (she just needs exposure!). It’s way too early to call these guys failures.

  • Kirsten

    As for Idol alumni being more successful than Voice alumni:  The
    reality is that unless you’re an avid Idol fan, post-Idol success goes
    relatively unnoticed.

    It might also get noticed by the person who won. I’m sure that Javier would rather have sold 1M than 35K. He’d rather have had a couple of hits on the radio. He’d rather be a success.

    It’s the career of the contestants. They’d be wise to consider if The Voice is really an avenue to success.

    It’s way too early to call these guys failures.

    For this round, it is. They may later re-group and find fame, but not from this iteration. Being on The Voice may get their names a second look by somebody in authority, but the ship has sailed for these albums.

  • Hazehel

    It results in more “artistic cred” for their contestants, giving the impression no one has to “sell out”.  

    That must be nonsense.  American Idol and The Voice are reality shows, the only reason there people don’t say much that’s negative about The Voice is because the winner is invisible.  Many people look at American Idol negatively precisely because its contestants are successful, people only pay attention to success story.  It’s easier to look kindly at failures. 

    I’ve always felt that winning American Idol comes with a price that not all artists are willing to pay. 

    It’s an illusion.  You only feel this way because The Voice deliberately go out of the way to look for professional singers (yup, those with supposed credibility), and most of those who appear are mostly guaranteed a place.   If Idol can promise the same thing (a place in the Top 24 or 36) and allow professionals with any current contract to audition, you’d see a flood of them.

  • Anonymous

    “It might also get noticed by the person who won. I’m sure that Javier would rather have sold 1M than 35K. He’d rather have had a couple of hits on the radio. He’d rather be a success.”

    True, but the point I was trying to make, is that success is frequently in the eye of the beholder and the reality is that the average viewer or potential contestant will not perceive someone like Lee as being more successful than Javier. 

    “Being on The Voice may get their names a second look by somebody in authority, but the ship has sailed for these albums.”

    And there’s nothing wrong with that.  Idol takes credit for J Hud, who became famous 4 years after her season, and they did absolutely nothing to help her post-Idol. At least three of the Voice contestants got to collaborate with major artists, which in my opinion, is a positive stepping stone. The idol formula of instant fame is only one of many paths to success and it certainly doesn’t guarantee longterm success.

  • Kirsten

    True, but the point I was trying to make, is that success is frequently
    in the eye of the beholder and the reality is that the average viewer or
    potential contestant will not perceive someone like Lee as being more
    successful than Javier. 

    Contestants should do their homework and resist making decisions based on perceptions.

    While I have a great deal of sympathy for Javier and his cohorts and some sympathy for S2 contestants (they wouldn’t have known how badly Voice contestants would flop when the auditioned), I will not have as much for Season 3 contestants should they whine that the show didn’t give them much of a career. That should not be news to them.

    It’s like contestants who come off of Survivor and complain that they got a bad edit.

  • Anonymous

    Hazehel: “It’s an illusion.  You only feel this way because The Voice deliberately go out of the way to look for professional singers (yup, those with supposed credibility), and most of those who appear are mostly guaranteed a place.”

    I’ve felt this way since season 7. Not even The Voice could pull off those kind of mindgames! 

    “Contestants should do their homework and resist making decisions based on perceptions.”

    True Kirsten, but I think an important part of that homework is understanding how a show is perceived and also deciding what you are prepared to sacrifice when you go on these reality shows. Idol is just not for everyone, and I’ve followed enough of my favorite Idol contestants to witness how easily the perception of the media and general public can help or hinder someone’s career. While The Voice may seem like risky uncharted territory, I can easily see why it would be appealing to some, even with all the facts at hand.

  • Hazehel

     I’ve felt this way since season 7. Not even The Voice could pull off those kind of mindgames!

    I have no idea what you meant, but you do realize that many of the contestants on The Voice were deliberately sought out the producers of the show?  These people with supposed credibility didn’t audition like those tens of thousands who joined the cattle call for Idol, they were invited to audition.  That was certainly what happened in season 1, they already got people lined up before the audition was announced.

  • ronnie

    I thought people were invited, they didn’t audition.  Are they changing that now?  They should probably just keep it as it is, I don’t think people care that much and it must cost a fortune for some huge casting call- and let’s face it, it’s luck more than anything else that gets these people through

  • Karen C

    I think they are auditioned first, and then the invitations come afterwards. 

  • Hazehel

    I think they are auditioned first, and then the invitations come afterwards.

    This is probably only true for some of the contestants.  Those destined to be chosen by the judges are likely to be mostly pre-selected because they are the professional singers.   We know that contestants were selected without going through an open audition in Season 1 – according to this –  
    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/miracle-voice-202039    they were already hunting for contestants in August 2010,  no audition was announced until December 2010, and the auditions weren’t held until January 2011.   

    So there were open auditions, but those chosen from the open auditions probably mostly end up as cannon fodder.  You can safely bet that people like Javier Colon, Dia Frampton, and Frenchie Davis were pre-selected.