Josiah Leming updates his fans (and I am one) via You Tube:

- Meeting with record labels next month
- Goal is to get an album out before summer and a summer tour.

Good luck Josiah! You can get Josiah’s music at his My Space.

 
  • MN Sue

    Ya gotta love his pie in the sky attitude. I hope he has someone in his life who is looking out for his professional interests and personal well being.

  • erennick

    Just love him! Thanks for posting.

  • PrplDva

    Awww! What a sweetie! I hope it all works out for him. He was so cute on Ellen when he promised that he did not cry a zillion times an hour like on AI, but then got all choked up when she gave him the $8000 in equipment.

  • Kirsten

    I hope it works out for him. Idols frequently get to talk to labels, but it doesn’t always mean they get signed. I think he’s got a real talent, but in the scarey music biz, even that doesn’t guarantee success.

    I’m cautiously optimistic. Go Josiah!

  • Chicago-sally

    I’m with Kirsten. This kid is an independent…he doesn’t have the steel to go with a complex contract and all the machinations of a Major Record company….an indie would work for him…Is one of the companies Disney? If not, then I don’t hold out hope for him.

    What he should do is get his singing and his act together and try out again for Idol next year.

  • Kirsten

    Ià ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢m with Kirsten. This kid is an independentà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ ¦he doesnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t have the steel to go with a complex contract and all the machinations of a Major Record company

    I never said that. I just wish him luck because it takes some luck mixed with talent to make it in those shark infested waters (talent optional).

    If he gets himself a good lawyer, then he should be able to sign a complex contract which tries to at least protect his interests. From the way he talks, it sounds like he does already have some kind of professional advice (“the plan right now is to get you guys an album by summer so that I can go on tour”). If Ellen and MTV were interested enough in this guy, I’m sure he’s had more than a few offers from agents/lawyers/groupies/etc

  • jersey

    Chicago-Sally – I don’t believe Josiah can try out for Idol next year. He made the top 50 and is therefore ineligible.

  • t2

    Yeah Jersey/Chicago — the whole coming back thing is so confusing though because Paula/Randy and Simon kept saying “Come back next year.”

  • Chicago-sally

    Jersey — I think he can because Chikezie and Gina did. Gina auditioned 5 times. Chikezie made it to Hollywood last year. David H. also auditioned.

    Does anybody know for sure?

    Kirsten: IMO he should try again next year. The fact that he boo-hooed in the elevator and on the stage several times, just makes me think he’s a fragile soul — and a little mixed up.

    I’m at his website, and he plays very well. I’m not convinced about his singing…he needs training really bad…maybe he should give his songs to a big hit maker. I’m not digging his little hole in the wall…now if this guy lives in a car, where is singing from…:)

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    Does anybody know for sure?

    Unless the rules have changed, and I don’t believe they have, once the contestants have made that last cut to the Top 40/44/50, they are ineligible to try out again.

    So, the answer is no. Kyle and Josiah are ineligible.

    I know, Paula kept telling people to come back, but she’s baked.

  • http://myspace.com/girlgeek mj

    maybe he should give his songs to a big hit maker.

    No, no he shouldn’t. He’s a singer/songwriter. He writes from personal experience. His songs are fine the way they are.

    Josiah isn’t cut out for Idol and vice-versa. IMO, Josiah got just what he needed out of the experience–exposure to his music. He’ll be fine.

  • Lu

    I’m still not getting all the Josiah love. I think he’s a really good song writer but I dont like his voice at all – especially when he sounds British – ugh.

    But he’s young and now that I know more about all he’s been through, I can understand why he appeared emotional on AI. I think AI helped that along with their editing. I wish him luck. I want to love his voice so I can be in the “I love Josiah” fanclub with most of you but I just cant. Different strokes, right? Maybe I’ve fallen under the influence of my daughter. I like Dave A. That boy can sing! I tihnk I need an intervention!

  • MaryS-NJ

    No, no he shouldnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t. Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s a singer/songwriter. He writes from personal experience. His songs are fine the way they are.

    Josiah isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t cut out for Idol and vice-versa. IMO, Josiah got just what he needed out of the experienceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’exposure to his music. Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ll be fine.

    I agree wholeheartedly. He sings from his heart and gets carried away in his music in a very personal (and in my opinion, compelling) way. He’s the one I will most interested in musically after this season ends. His song “To Run” gets stuck in my head.

    If Josiah could do more Grace Kelly type songs, or the kind of stuff Blake did last season, that would work for him on AI, but weeks and weeks of overdone cover tunes would not show off his real talents. Taking Garrett’s experience behind the scenes with song “choices” I think he wouldn’t have been happy anyway.

    Josiah’s not the best singer technically, and while I’ve never been one to vote for the purest vocals (I’m all about interpretation and passion) I think within the constraints of American Idol’s format Josiah wouldn’t have stood a chance.

    He’s getting great exposure now and people are aware of his music. As a young Indie artist, that’s a good start.

  • erennick

    No, no he shouldnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t. Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s a singer/songwriter. He writes from personal experience. His songs are fine the way they are.

    Josiah isnà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t cut out for Idol and vice-versa. IMO, Josiah got just what he needed out of the experienceà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’exposure to his music. Heà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢ll be fine.

    Exactly MJ. The voice you need to go far on Idol (i.e. big range, without ever cracking on a note) is not necessarily the same as the one it takes to make it in the real world. What you need is a great tone, with a ton of emotion, and Josiah has that in spades.

    Gina and Chekezie were able to audition again bc they were cut in the rooms- they didn’t make it to the chair episode. Several (past) contestants have confirmed that once you make it that far, you are ineligible to audition again. Why does that rule exist? Who knows. On Canadian Idol, you can come back again if you get cut before the Top 10. Imagine what AI would be like if Ayla Brown, etc. got a second chance?

  • poporange

    I will have to support Lu view point and I listened to his singing. The problem is if a little messed up how would Josiah handle the hardship of the record company or if he suddenly becomes indespencible . You need to be realistic, mature a strong backbone and that still may not help out because it is raugh out thier and thier are many sob stories.

    David A probably around the same age has that expeariance, and I have not heard a youngster sing like that since Les Meserabla which is a compliment. Thier is a hidden maturity to his voice.The fact he looks soo young I just hope he does more than just pop-music.

  • flicker

    For me, Josiah’s songs are what make him special. I’m not crazy over his voice, if you take just the vocals alone. But, there’s a lot of singer/songwriters that I could say the same thing about. And I tend to buy singer/songwriter music more than just pretty vocals. I will buy whatever Josiah puts out, as long as it’s his original stuff. I am not interested in hearing him sing covers .

    And, for Sally, he’s said in several interviews that he’s staying with his mom in TN right now. He was back home by the time his Idol episodes aired. His family is poor, so I guess that’s why their home looks like a hole-in-the-wall.

  • http://myspace.com/saltwatercures pj

    What makes an artist interesting to me is much more than “the voice.” Like flicker said, songwriting is huge. And I don’t mean just a good hook. As for “the voice,” I prefer interesting/quirky voices over the big, belting technically perfect voices. So, yeah, I don’t own any Celine or Mariah. I do own some Radiohead and Coldplay. That seems to be the direction he wants to pursue, so I see his appeal. Plus, he clearly sings with true emotion, which is another part of his appeal.

    Anyhoo, go Josiah. Good luck to you. :biggrin_wp:

  • abbysee

    I on the Josiah is awesome bandwagon. His songwriting is his ticket, but his voice is compelling too. Tbere are some real good singers out there that sing a bunch of crap that others foist on them. Then there are those like Josiah that sing their own stuff, maybe with not the purest of voices, but with a helluva lot of heart and guts. Those people will get me every time, and Josiah will have my money for his first cd.

  • MaryS-NJ

    David A probably around the same age has that expeariance, and I have not heard a youngster sing like that since Les Meserabla which is a compliment. Thier is a hidden maturity to his voice.The fact he looks soo young I just hope he does more than just pop-music.

    My daughter is smitten with David A. She was so-so on Josiah. This is one we disagree on.

    I appreciate David for what he is – potential clean-cut teen heart throb who sings music my daughter can listen to without worry. I was a Donny Osmond fan back in the day. David A = Donny Osmond for a different generation. Furhtermore, I think he’s what the PTB want – the missing ingredient: a boy pop singer who appeals to the Disney demographic, Moms and Grandmas.

    Josiah is something else. He’s really impressed me as a song writer and the way he infuses his music with feeling, especially considering his age. My husband said the other day when I played one of Josiah’s songs “He sounds like David Gray.”

  • Lu

    I dont like Bob Dylan either. It’s mostly about the voice to me I guess and that may be why I’m a little baffled by the appeal. Any way, good luck to him. If the general public receives him like those here at MJ’s, he’ll be huge.

    ETA: I loved Donny Osmond too… I still do – I’m lame.

  • http://americanidollowdown.blogspot.com/ Sherry L

    I found Josiah very interesting. Part of me wishes he would have made it through to the top 24 just to see how he would have done.

    It was pretty obvious he wasn’t ready though. Independent singer/songwriter or not, you should be able to play with other musicians. He definitely needs to work on that.

  • milajoy

    I just adore this kid. He really is a genuine nice person. This MTV article is the best one on Josiah:

    Josiah Leming And Me, In Bigger Than The

    ‘American Idol’ castoff reminds our reporter of himself à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  and everyone à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  at 18.
    By James Montgomery

    On The Record: Josiah Leming Is You à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  Only With More MySpace Friends

    Any time you start your day with an impromptu business meeting at an International House of Pancakes (in Tennessee, no less), you know things are going to get fairly surreal. When that meeting is followed by an hour-long drive to a bait-and-tackle shop in Dandridge à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  “the second oldest town in the state!” à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  where you’re greeted by a one-eyed dog and taken upstairs to meet the biological grandparents of an 18-year-old former reality-TV contestant who sings like Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst and looks kind of like Haley Joel Osment (pre-DUI, of course), well, let’s just say things quickly head into uncharted territory.

    And yet, that’s exactly how I spent my weekend, trekking around Eastern Tennessee with Josiah Leming, the “American Idol” also-ran who might very well be the most popular contestant to never make the show’s top 24, thanks in no small part to that voice, those looks and his back story (which, depending on whom you ask, was either 50 or 90 percent embellished by “Idol” producers). Throughout the day, I met his grandparents, his aunt-turned-manager, his nephew, his extended family and his vindictive ex-girlfriend. I went to the high school he dropped out of at the age of 17, the park he wasted afternoons in, and the skating rink he used to haunt (the locals call it “the skanking rink”). I saw the Chick-fil-A he used to work at, the basement where he wrote his songs, and the final resting place of his now-infamous 1989 Mercury Topaz, the vehicle he drove across the country on his quest to get famous.

    Reeling off miles of Tennessee county roads in a pickup truck a family friend had loaned him (being famous has its perks), Leming spoke about growing up in rural Morristown, about the lousy jobs that come with growing up there, and à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  most prominently à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  about the music he started writing at 13 as a way of breaking the small-town cycle. He said he writes mostly about emotions that course through his veins à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  sadness and anxiety à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  and that he is obsessed with the concept of death, of some great specter coming for us all. He wants to help people with his music, to heal them and help them survive. And he says he doesn’t care if he ever gets famous.

    Later, in the basement of his parents’ house, he plays a couple of songs on a battered old piano. The room is littered with Dr Pepper cans, cigarette butts and bags of Friskies Seafood Sensation cat food. The walls are covered with Radiohead and Smiths posters, a framed photo showing him and his brother playing in a band, and a thrift-store painting of an old wooden ship adrift at sea. It is exactly like any other teenage melodramatic’s hideout, dirty and closed off from the rest of the world à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  only the music that is currently filling it is something otherworldly. Leming does not play piano so much as he assaults it, hammering the keys with his stubby fingers. The music that explodes from the rickety piano is booming and urgent, a little unsettling, incredibly raw. Honest.

    And then there’s his voice, which is startling as much for its clarity as for the reckless way Leming wields it. One minute he’s barely whispering; the next, he’s screaming in a ragged, full-throttle roar; then he lets it fade out in an airy vibrato. In the room, with it bouncing off the walls, it’s almost disorienting. You don’t hear people sing this way … with this little regard for their vocal cords or for the people around them. To say that the television cameras do not do it justice is an understatement of LaKisha Jones-ian proportions.

    Then it’s over à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  we shake hands and I return to my hotel. The following morning, I am sitting on a plane in Knoxville, and my BlackBerry is positively humming with e-mails from friends. “What’s Josiah like?!?” they want to know. “Does he cry all the time?” “Does he still live in his car?!?” It seems they are just as fascinated by the boy with the voice as I am.

    So, as a service to pretty much everyone, here it is. Josiah does not cry all the time (he didn’t tear up once when I was with him) and he doesn’t live in his car anymore, though it is sitting in the driveway of his parents’ home in Morristown. As for the man himself, well, that’s slightly more complicated. Because Josiah is unlike anyone I have ever met before, but also a lot like everyone else, too.

    He is very nice. He answered all my questions and was willing to talk about anything. But at the same time, I also got the sense that he could definitely be a jerk if the situation warranted it, in the same way that Radiohead’s Thom Yorke or Oberst or anyone with a prodigious level of talent and a mission could be a jerk. He was very wary of those close to him latching onto his fame, and because of that I could see him alienating people just because they were standing in his way, or because they are out to get him. That is the way it has to be.

    He speaks in glorious generalities, about death and life and his dreams, in a way most idealistic, gifted 18-year-olds do. They tend to think they are very wise, that they have seen it all. And maybe he has. Who am I to judge? I wanted to snicker, to think in my head, “Oh, just wait …” But then I remembered that when I was 18, I spoke in the same all-knowing manner. So did à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  or will à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  all of us, probably.

    But perhaps the thing I got the most from my weekend with him was the overwhelming feeling that he is going to be very, very famous. He is prodigiously talented, largely self-taught and driven beyond his years. At the moment, the world is his oyster.

    Yet I could also see him not amounting to much of anything: He could very well sign with a major label that would not know what to do with him, would waste his talents and eventually drop him into the castoff bin. He is in a precarious situation, to be sure à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬’  an indie-caliber talent who didn’t seem all that keen on signing to an indie label, because he has big dreams and big ambitions.

    Who knows though? I could be wrong about all that. But I don’t think I am. And in the meantime, I’m going to stick with my gut feeling that this kid from Eastern Tennessee truly has something and that we’ll be hearing from him for years to come, and that he’ll always be known as “The one ‘Idol’ producers let slip away.”

    Regardless, it’s a safe bet that he won’t be packing his things into his Mercury Topaz any time soon; he’s clearly graduated to another level. What that next level holds for him, I’m not exactly sure. But I hope it’s big things. In a way, he represents the dreamer inside us all … his goals were once everyone’s goals, and we’re all rooting for him to make it, because we don’t want to think about what it means if he doesn’t.

    After all, for all the ephemera surrounding him, Leming reminds me most of another 18-year-old dreamer that I once knew: me. And you probably feel the same way too.

  • http://occasionaldiscourse.blogspot.com/ Derrick

    I really think Josiah is on his way to great things, but I am torn on what path he should take. Part of me thinks that he needs more life experiences (you know, keep driving around America and living out of his car for a couple more years) and keep honing his voice – both literally and his voice as a songwriter. The other part of me says he needs to do something soon while people still remember him. But then I think – Who could forget?

  • marco5ny

    I don’t get the Josiah love either. He seems to be everywhere for his 15 minutes but so many disappear after burning so hot in the collective minds of reality show viewers. Time will tell.

  • LakesideUK

    Unless the rules have changed, and I donà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢t believe they have, once the contestants have made that last cut to the Top 40/44/50, they are ineligible to try out again.

    So, the answer is no. Kyle and Josiah are ineligible.

    I know, Paula kept telling people to come back, but sheà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â€ž ¢s baked.

    Brandon Green (fingernails-in-bag-bloke) seems to think that he can come back:-

    http://idolforums.com/index.php?showtopic=532266&st=3299

    but that’s the only evidence of any kind I’ve stumbled across.

    Not that I think Josiah should try out again, btw. Idol has given him a good kickstart but now the best course for him (I believe) is to sign to an Indie label, get out on the road and build his reputation the traditional way. I hope he doesn’t rush his album either – cashing in on his AI fame is tempting but he shouldn’t do it at the expense of a quality product.

    Anyway, I wish him luck – he’s a talented kid.

  • http://josiahleming.blogspot.com/ josiah leming

    hes gonna make it for sure. probably this year hes gonna sign a contract with a record company and become what he wants in music.

  • http://jviz.blogspot.com/2008/03/josiah-leming.html jviz.blogspot.com

    Oh American Idol, such a cheesey show…why do we love it so much?

    Josiah is such a great guy, we need more stars like him with a good heart, here is a great article about him

  • james