Idols In Concert – Stats – 01/06/11

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The love for the Oct 21st concert stats continue, but this time with a few new stats from December sprinkled in. So odd. No new Idol concert stats to report (all have been reported before). So, let’s look at two interesting articles that BB put out. Or not.

First up is a year-end report full of some great stats (a few pulled out after the jump): http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/industry/retail/u-s-album-sales-dropped-12-8-last-year-digital-1004137880.story

The second is an article about the interesting deal that The Beatles negotiated in order to allow their songs on iTunes. They get paid royalties directly from iTunes instead of the label. Apparently, this is the kind of deal a lot of artists would like (no creative accounting by the labels) and there are court cases out there trying to get it to happen. Also interesting is the talk of royalty rates. They say that superstars typically get 20% of the retail revenue. Interesting on its own, but what has long been debated is whether artists saw an increase in royalty rates when iTunes increased their prices. The rate usually quoted is 10 cents per track which would be 10% per 99 cents. Based on the math in the article it appears that they are now getting 13 cents. Small change, but it does add up. BB Beatles iTunes Deal Pays Royalties Directly to Band, Publisher, Sources Say

Some stats:
Albums
2010 Music Sales Year officially ended Jan 2nd, 2011
Total Album Sales: 326.2M (down 12.8% from the 373.9M sold 2009)
Digital Albums: 86.3M (up 13% from the 76.4M sold 2009), 26.5% of all albums sold
Physical CD Sales: Down 20% (for fourth year in a row).

Albums Selling more than 1M: 13 (22 last 2009) – lowest number in SS history
Best Selling Album: Eminem’s Recovery 3.4M

Catalog Albums (+18 months): 138.9M (down 15.3% from the 163.9M sold 2009)
Current Albums (-18 months, stay in top 100 or active at radio): 187.3M (down 10.8% from the 209.9M sold 2009)
First Year in the last 5 that catalog albums sold less than current albums.

Tracks
Digital Tracks: 1.17B (up 1% from the 1.16B sold 2009)

Tracks Selling More than 4M: 5 (4 in 2009)
Tracks Selling More than 3M, but less than 4M: 7 (3 in 2009)
Tracks Selling More than 1M: 86 (89 in 2009)
Top Selling Track: Katy Perry “California Gurls” 4.4.M

Highest Week for Download Sales 2010: 44M
Highest Week for Download Sales 2009: 44.8M (week ending Dec 27th, 2009)
Highest Week for Downloads Ever: 47.7M (week ending Dec 28th, 2008)
(They lament this, but they are ignoring the changing dates, IMO. iTunes sales drop significantly prior to Christmas because people are too busy getting ready for Christmas and don’t want to buy something they might receive anyway, plus the airwaves are full of Christmas songs. They start buying after Christmas. Each year, Christmas marches a day or two forward shortening the amount of after Christmas sales in a week. With Christmas falling on a Sunday this year, just watch sales explode the three days after Christmas will all be in one week).


Summary

Albums+TEA: 443.4M (down 9.5% from the 489.8M sold 2009) – TEA is 10 digital tracks equaling one album
Overall Music Unit Sales: 1.51B (down 2.4% from the 1.55B sold 2009) First drop in the digital era

Market Share:
Universal MG: 31.4%
Sony MG: 27.4%
Warner MG: 19.8%
EMI: 9.6%
Independent: 11.6%

 
  • mickeybordentwo

    As a writer, I’ve been following the ebook issue with some interest. Authors are arguing that since electronic rights were never part of their intial contract agreements (since at the time of agreement, electronic rights didn’t exist), then those rights belong to them and not to the book’s publisher.

    For writers with successful backlists, the additional royalties from Kindle, etc. could add up to a pretty penny.

    I wonder if bands and songwriters are using the same argument. It’s unlikely that the Beatles contracts included download clauses, in which case their argument must be they retain control since it was never negotiated otherwise.

  • Kirsten

    I wonder if bands and songwriters are using the same argument. It’s unlikely that the Beatles contracts included download clauses, in which case their argument must be they retain control since it was never negotiated otherwise.

    I’m not up on all the terms, but are they saying something like that here in the article?

    Since the dawn of the digital age, artists, managers and labels have wrangled over whether a digital download purchase should be considered a licensed use of a master recording or a retail sale, much like the sale of a CD. Labels, of course, insist the latter designation is correct and have paid artist royalties accordingly.

  • Tess

    Didn’t Pink Floyd just win a lawsuit against EMI where digital downloads are now forbidden to sell their album traks as singles. This says to me that Artists are beginning to win back some of the control over their albums and I think it is a good thing.

  • http://www.twilightslo.com Mateja

    Some more numbers from Yahoo! Chart Watch:

    Week Ending Jan. 2, 2011: This Is No Bomb

    Chart Watch Extra: We Have A Winner
    Top 20 best-selling singles of 2010

    Digital sales were strong in 2010. Five songs sold at least 4 million digital copies during the year, which is more than in any previous year. (There were four 4-million sellers in 2009.) Records were also set for the most 3-million sellers (12), the most 2-million sellers (37) and the most 500,000 sellers (at least 200). There was a drop only in the number of 1-million sellers. There were 86 in 2010, down slightly from 2009, when there were 89.

    Chart Watch Extra: Eminem Does It Again
    Top 10 best-selling albums of 2010

  • HermeticallySealed

    If I am reading right, that artists make .13 cents per singles download, I can safely state that we can rest easy about how well Kris and Adam are doing. Just for LLYD and WWFM, the two made over 200k last year, which is 10 years of income for me.

    (Is thinking that my roommate may be on to something with his plan for a one hit wonder career.)

  • Tess

    Top 10 best-selling albums of 2010

    I still think the numbers game is very weird when it comes to record sales. Since albums are released at different times during a calendar year how can tracking them only through the year really demonstrate the popularity of an album? I mean someone releasing in Q1 is going to have the benefit of more time to garner sales whereas someone in Q4 is likely to see their sales stagger two calendar years.

    Why can’t measurement be for a 12 month period based on album release date. Just seems more equable to me.

  • springboard

    Just for LLYD and WWFM, the two made over 200k last year, which is 10 years of income for me.

    From what I understand, artists repay the label for expenses like production, promo etc.., so it is possible that they don’t see much of their earnings

  • HermeticallySealed

    Maybe, though I would think that comes out of the other portion of the sale. Could very well be wrong.

  • JazzRocks

    Not sure if this has been posted or if this is the right place to post. :) Nevertheless here it is:

    WWFM moves up 9 spots to #11 on the French Charts
    http://bit.ly/aBOijj

  • Valentin432

    Why can’t measurement be for a 12 month period based on album release date. Just seems more equable to me.

    How exactly would you apply that? You would make a chart of every single album that have reached twelve months of sales in 2010?
    This means every album from January 2009 to December 2009.

    That could be done but it would be strange. You would be excluding any album released in 2010 which constitutes the bulk of the sales for the year.

  • tinawina

    This is not the only way albums are measured. These are just stats collected at the end of the year. No one piece of data determines an individual project’s success.

  • jpfan

    Billboard used to have their own calendar year for measuring album sales. I think it began at the end of October which was great for Idol albums usually released in November.

    It’s just one piece of data. No more, no less.

  • tripp_ncwy

    From what I understand, artists repay the label for expenses like production, promo etc.., so it is possible that they don’t see much of their earnings

    That’s why you want write your own songs. You will have additional revenue streams from the music.

  • jpfan

    That’s why you want write your own songs.

    Or refuse to record songs unless you get a credit as a co-writer. I think certain big stars play this game as well. Smart.

  • tripp_ncwy

    Or refuse to record songs unless you get a credit as a co-writer. I think certain big stars play this game as well. Smart.

    Yeah and retain the publishing rights for additional revenue opportunities.

  • tinawina

    Or refuse to record songs unless you get a credit as a co-writer. I think certain big stars play this game as well. Smart.

    **coughbeyoncecoungh** **coughmadonnacough** :D

  • Elliegrll

    **coughbeyoncecoungh*

    Yep, Beyonce has co-writing and publishing credit for songs that were written years before the songs were pitched to her.

  • Eileen99

    Elliegrll:
    01/06/2011 at 10:45 am
    **coughbeyoncecough**

    Yep, Beyonce has co-writing and publishing credit for songs that were written years before the songs were pitched to her.

    Ha! This reminds me of the comment Mat Kearney made to Jim Cantiello last year about how most artists who come in to “co-write” with him just sit on the couch & watch him write a song, & how surprised he was that Kris actually wanted to participate (and did).

    But yeah, if you can write or co-write your material, you’re in a much better position financially.

  • Hazehel

    Albums
    2010 Music Sales Year officially ended Jan 2nd, 2011
    Total Album Sales: 326.2M (down 12.8% from the 373.9M sold 2009)
    Digital Albums: 86.3M (up 13% from the 76.4M sold 2009), 26.5% of all albums sold
    Physical CD Sales: Down 20% (for fourth year in a row).

    Albums Selling more than 1M: 13 (22 last 2009) – lowest number in SS history
    Best Selling Album: Eminem’s Recovery 3.4M

    Some comparison with UK sales, falling but not as bad –
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/jan/05/album-sales-plummet-sixth-year-running

    Adding last year sales to list for last ten years to show the trend -

    Year — Albums — Singles
    2000 – 134.3m – 55.7m
    2001 – 144.9m – 51.2m
    2002 – 149.2m – 43.9m
    2003 – 159.3m – 30.9m
    2004 – 163.4m – 32.3m
    2005 – 159.0m – 47.9m
    2006 – 154.7m – 66.9m
    2007 – 138.1m – 86.6m
    2008 – 133.6m – 115.1m
    2009 – 128.9m – 152.7m
    2010 – 119.9m – 161.8m

    That represents fall of ~16% from the year 2000 for album sales.

    Best selling album of 2010 -
    Take That – Progress – 1,841,100

    Best selling single of 2010 -
    Eminem feat. Rihanna – Love the Way You Lie - 855,000
    (Matt Cardle of X-Factor just missed beating this at 815,000 with just three week of sales only)

    Best selling album last ten years –
    James Blunt – Back to Bedlam – 3.2 million

    Best selling single last ten years -
    Will Young – ‘Anything Is Possible/Evergreen’ – 1.8 million

    # of albums in 2010 selling >300,000 – 35 (300K is platinum status in UK, equivalent to 1 million in US)
    # of albums in 2010 selling >1 million – 3

  • Masieta

    I’ve said it before here, but WHY don’t artists/labels return to the 50′s and just give us singles, especially if labels keep putting off album release until they think they have some singles that will be hits? I would love to have Kris’ new song, “Leave You Alone,” already. The album could then be a compilation of greatest hits. As it stands now, artists spend years working on something that basically only fans will purchase and others will pick over, in the end choosing single tracks to download.

  • smeggingnuts

    Masieta:
    01/06/2011 at 12:46 pm
    I’ve said it before here, but WHY don’t artists/labels return to the 50’s and just give us singles, especially if labels keep putting off album release until they think they have some singles that will be hits? I would love to have Kris’ new song, “Leave You Alone,” already. The album could then be a compilation of greatest hits. As it stands now, artists spend years working on something that basically only fans will purchase and others will pick over, in the end choosing single tracks to download.

    I think that is why there has been a recent trend from some of the big names in putting out EP’s.

  • Elliegrll

    More artists are releasing EPs, and some are releasing more than one single before they release their albums.

  • car

    So far the labels probably have not gone to the singel release only format because many artists can still sell albums and singels. And album sales would still make more money than a single only release. It is for the benefit of the label and not just for the artist.

  • Tess

    I can still remember the day when an Artist only released singles…and if they were accepted and played on the radio then they would be compiled into an album for fan consumption. Albums were “rewards” for good Artists…not the beginning of the process.

  • Elliegrll

    So far the labels probably have not gone to the singel release only format because many artists can still sell albums and singels. And album sales would still make more money than a single only release. It is for the benefit of the label and not just for the artist.

    The whole industry is in trouble, not just certain artists. The bar for what constitutes selling a lot of albums has also been lowered. I think it’s a case of the industry not keeping up with technology, and being fast and willing to make a profit off of the new technology. Even some artists, for example Justin Timberlake, have said the same thing.

  • tinawina

    The whole industry is in trouble, not just certain artists. The bar for what constitutes selling a lot of albums has also been lowered. I think it’s a case of the industry not keeping up with technology, and being fast and willing to make a profit off of the new technology. Even some artists, for example Justin Timberlake, have said the same thing.

    Yeah, I think so too. A whole new approach is needed I think, but it is like they just keep tweaking things instead of going for a radical overhaul. But big corporations have always been resistant to change, so there’s nothing new there.

  • Hazehel

    Yeah, I think so too. A whole new approach is needed I think, but it is like they just keep tweaking things instead of going for a radical overhaul. But big corporations have always been resistant to change, so there’s nothing new there.

    They should have done something else when Napster came along – incorporating the new trend into their business model, instead of trying to squash everything in sight. The music industry is profligate and greedy, and had grown lazy by all the easy money that was being made, don’t see that things like Napster is a new opportunity rather than people trying to steal their ill-gotten gain. It was possible to incorporate the young upstarts like Shawn Fanning into their money-making world years back, but it’s too late now.

    And no, I’m not sympathetic to all their whining. In the UK they are still selling more music than the first half of 90′s and earlier (and probably selling about the same as the latter half of 90s), so it’s not as if it’s the end of the world.

  • hoosiermama

    I did my part for season 9 sales by purchasing both Lee and Crystal’s albums yesterday (actually I wanted them but no one got me them for Christmas). My Target had plenty of both, along with Carrie’s, Adam’s, Archie’s, and Daughtry. Kris is totally gone–he doesn’t even have an alphabetical bin anymore. Forgot to check for Danny’s bin, but I didn’t see his album on the display of country albums.

    It’s interesting that the sticker for Crystal’s says: “Debut album from the critically acclaimed American Idol Runner-Up. Features Hold On, Lonely, Holy Toledo, & the arresting title track Farmer’s Daughter” In contrast, Lee’s sticker says simply: “The all new album from Your American Idol! Featuring Sweet Serendipity and Live it Up”. I don’t know who writes those stickers, but kudos to Crystal for the better promo on it!

  • Dlynne

    I’ve said it before here, but WHY don’t artists/labels return to the 50’s and just give us singles, especially if labels keep putting off album release until they think they have some singles that will be hits? I would love to have Kris’ new song, “Leave You Alone,” already. The album could then be a compilation of greatest hits. As it stands now, artists spend years working on something that basically only fans will purchase and others will pick over, in the end choosing single tracks to download.

    I agree with you to a point. But the recent Soundscan numbers tell us that 70% of album sales are still made by hard copy sales. Digital album sales are under 30%. At this point in time I don’t see how the industry could survive solely on digital singles. Until the majority of sales are digital, it just doesn’t make financial sense.

  • Dlynne

    I can still remember the day when an Artist only released singles…and if they were accepted and played on the radio then they would be compiled into an album for fan consumption. Albums were “rewards” for good Artists…not the beginning of the process.

    I remember those days, too. It would make sense to establish an artist by releasing a single first before the label invests a lot of money in an album. There’s also something to be said for leaving the fans wanting more.

  • larc

    Dlynne:
    I remember those days, too. It would make sense to establish an artist by releasing a single first before the label invests a lot of money in an album. There’s also something to be said for leaving the fans wanting more.

    One good thing about those “singles” was there was another recording on the flip side. That sometimes turned out to be as much or even more a hit than the main release. Today’s singles are unfortunately just that.

  • larc

    Hazehel:
    Some comparison with UK sales, falling but not as bad –

    There’s not much question that singles sales have been cannibalizing album sales in the UK as well as the US. If we follow the logic that 10 singles are equal to one album, UK decrease from 2000 to 2010 wasn’t ~16% but ~2.71%. Sales of singles offset losses in album sales to that extent. I don’t have US numbers for all that period, but I’ll bet that approach would take claimed decreases for this country down quite a bit as well.

  • Hazehel

    I don’t have US numbers for all that period

    The number for the year 2000 I have is 785 million units, so that represent a fall of ~58% from 2000 for US album sales.

    I don’t have the number for total singles sales for US in 2000, but US singles sales had pretty much crashed to nearly nothing by 2002 . Using the number given above of Albums+TEA of 443.4M, that would give us a drop of ~44%, perhaps just a percentage or two more if you subtract whatever units of singles that sold in the year 2000.

    If you want to have a look at the historical trend in sales for UK music, here is one chart –
    http://www.everyhit.com/annualsales.html

    Note that the numbers in the chart are different from the numbers I gave above, that’s because before 2000 (I think, not sure of the exact cut-off date) they count two CDs in an album as two albums (the chart stopped in 2005 perhaps because they stopped doing that completely by that date). This could also be why some figures given for US early in the decade might be higher than 785 million.

    I don’t have a link for similar US chart, the chart I have I downloaded some time ago. The trend in the US roughly follow the UK chart before 2000 with minor variations, the most significant being in the early 90s, when sales dipped only slightly in 2001 before rising again in the US whereas it dipped for a few years in the UK. I assume that’s because grunge started to take hold in the US (grunge was never as big in the UK). After 2000 the difference is quite dramatic – the sales continue to rise in the UK until 2005 but it dropped almost continously in the US down to ~40% of the height of the peak year 1999.