Haley Reinhart and Phillip Phillips - Let's Talk Live (VIDEO)

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Photo: @19News

Haley Reinhart and Phillip Philips are interviewed on the local talk show, Let’s Talk Live, ahead of their appearance tonight at the Washington DC Hard Rock Cafe for a benefit raising funds for cancer awareness. Over 100 bands are involved in the nearly 40 hour marathon of music.

It’s nice to see the Season 10 alum and Season 11 winner join forces for such a GREAT cause! Watch their joint interview below.

Via PhillipPhillipsOnline

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  • http://twitter.com/Free_in_march El oh El

    Phillip comes off so bashful in that interview. Is he always like that?

  • wkstrack

    I think that’s his personality off too. Nothing wrong with being shy but P2 is going to have to get more comfortable in interviews and the media. I’ve seen people compare Phillip with Kris but IMO Kris never came off as shy and nervous as Phillip is in interviews and in front of the cameras.

  • durbesque

    Double platinum?  Does he know? or care?  I doubt it. lol

    Haley is consciously nice.  Phillip just is.

  • getaway1

    It goes back to the people doing the interview – and how prepared or unprepared they are.  The interviewer said something about how Phillip stood up against Idol and stuck to his guns about wearing T-shirts.  If she had done her homework, she would have known that it was really about Tommy Hilfiger saying that Phillip would not get votes for wearing gray.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_S3ZGXZCUE2YYOS7QV6QSTKM4SA buffynut2001

    Phillip like Kris in interviews? No way!! Kris is full of personality. Phillip almost put me to sleep. The only thing that kept me awake was Haley’s facial expressions! LOL!

  • http://twitter.com/Free_in_march El oh El

    Yeah they were typical interviewers that didn’t seem to know much except what was on the notes. The guy didn’t even know what the name of Phillip’s song was after he lost his “script” x)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_F3XJE5GRAUMYR7Y5RYZUW7SC4U md

    Haley is nice, period. People who went to school with her say so. People who work with her say so. People who meet her out in public say so. In other words, people who have actually met her say so.

  • thirdtime

    Phillip did seem really laid back here, but then again so did the interviewers.  The only thing I found disturbing is that he had no clue what to say about his single.  He didn’t say the name of it, or say it is definitely available now on itunes, or mention that he has an album coming out soon – he just mumbled he thinks it may be double platinum.  He really should at least know what to say when asked about his own music.

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    Haley is consciously nice.  Phillip just is.

    If I’d just gotten back from a trip to Taiwan, I’d be having to make a conscious effort to be nice, too — not to mention a conscious effort to be coherent and, well, conscious. Reinhart’s right in there, making eye contact, smiling, and hitting her talking points in reasonably cogent sentences. She’s a pro.

    P2 seems to have absorbed the Idol “we like our winners humble” ethos to the point of being unwilling to make eye contact or speak above a mumble. This may be canny of him in appealing to his Idol fans, but it puts a lot of burden on the interviewer to make things lively enough for viewers who aren’t familiar with him from Idol. These interviewers weren’t getting there.

  • durbesque

    It’s nice to be nice.  Phillip is nice, too.

    The guy said something to Haley about “one of your hits”…
    that was really nice.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_F3XJE5GRAUMYR7Y5RYZUW7SC4U md

    I never said or implied Phillip wasn’t nice. I’m sure if you asked Haley she would say he is. And if you asked Phillip he would say she is.

    After this appearance, PinkJams tweeted:

    “See ya’ll at @HardRockDC for @Phillips and @HaleyReinhart tonight. Those two are seriously fantastic people and artists.”

    And another tweeted,

    “It was cool meeting @Phillips and @HaleyReinhart today while flooring
    Lets Talk Live. Real down to earth people. Good luck tonight!”

    You would be fortunate to have people say such glowing things about you.

  • dd999

    Its nice that Haley and Phillip are on a show together at the Hard Rock Cafe!  I think, their music complements each others! Haley is getting really good at speaking in interviews, she’s very down-to-earth and forth-right! Phillip was very tired, so I’ll give him break for not being alert, when some of the questions were asked!

  • wkstrack

    Meh. IMO that is how PP is in general.  And has said that he gets nervous when he does interviews…still. 

  • roarpen

    Is Haley a defacto Season 11 Idol now?  Well, it’s nice for her anyway.

  • http://twitter.com/jerryt9789 Jerry

    I think Phillip did very well, he is just starting out and his interview skills will improve as time goes on. His management hasn’t had time to mold him yet. Haley is just as awesome as ever:) Haley and Phillip seem to have some good chemistry between them, I think we will see more of these two together on stage in the future

  • http://twitter.com/Free_in_march El oh El

    This benefit was sponsored by Interscope.

    https://twitter.com/INTERSCOPEPROMO/status/251823226517344257

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100002249788650 Toyang Smyth

    i love you Philli Phillips!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Incipit

    Reinhart’s right in there, making eye contact, smiling, and hitting her talking points in reasonably cogent sentences. She’s a pro.

    She’s been a quick study. And…that’s why she was there. Entirely too often, the interviewer is not any kind of pro – and someone has to be – someone has to steer the conversation, so the whole PR opportunity isn’t wasted. 

    IMO.

  • http://twitter.com/BuranaBurana Carmina Burana

    I am still of the opinion that Philip’s fans did him a disfavor in voting so heavily for him to win AI.  Everything in his demeanor screams to me that does not give a damn to fame, sales record, or any of the schtick that being American Idol implies, and even impose to its winners.  Had he been voted out as 2nd or 3rd runner up we would, on the personal side, have been able to retrieve earlier to take care of his health, sparing him perhaps 2-3 weeks of pain and suffering.  Even financially, it probably would not been much different for him, provided that his and Jessica’s record contract differed in only in about 100K and he probably forfeited a lot of the more lucrative gigs for being unable to fulfill the Disney / Walmart type of gigs while recovering from surgery.

    On the artistic side, he would have been able to follow more into Haley’s steps, in taking more time to work on his first record, write his own songs, things that he has been very vocal about wanting to do and seems so far to be in the losing end of the fight.  Unfortunately, being the AI crown bearer implies in putting a record out ASAP to capitalize in the title and aiming at selling a lot of them to promote the franchise.  This is invariably a much more commercial than authoral type of record, which will probably peeves him to no end.

    I also think that Philip – differently  by the other WGWG winners – is introspective by nature, and as such, he would be better off in a band as opposed to follow a solo career.  He would be even be able to work with his brother in law, which he seem to be very keen of.  Again, being the crown bearer pretty much shuts such possibility off for him.

    I think regardless of what he puts out come November, he will be able to sell enough to avoid the “FAILED” label.  But ultimately, an artist’s success is defined by longevity, by being relevant 5-10 years down the road. To achieve that, it’s paramount that the artist feel comfortable and connected with his public persona.  Right now, there seems to be a disconnection between what he wants to be and what AI precludes its winner to be, and he seems to be going though the same path of the past male winners.  Mind you: I don’t think there is a lack of talent on the WGWG winners, i just think their artistic profiles are different form what AI expects a winner to be.  Lose-lose situation…

  • rodolfochengcanepa

    i just saw some photos of P2´s with a new platinum record during the pinktober, apparently his single “Home” has been certified as double platinum already. Good 4 him if this is true, but 4 the colours of the CDs, i think that looks more like a platinum-gold record…

  • http://twitter.com/CanadianLady2 CanadianLady

    I think Phillip did great. They were there to promote the event and they did it. If I didn’t know who Phillip was I’d be looking him up. The name “Home” was mentioned. He seemed very natural and “real.” I’d way rather have someone who didn’t seem all caught up in the stats than someone who reeled it off like it had been memorized.

    One question – why do so many people start sentences with “I mean…”? Haley did it twice here and I’ve seen others do it too. I find that very annoying.

  • jpfan2

    if P2 hadn’t won, 19 wouldn’t have their biggest selling coronation single ever. Usually WGWGs who win are doomed but I think P2 has the best chance of all of them of retaining his viability as an artist. Home should go 2xplat in 2 or 3 weeks so maybe they got the record ready early. ;0

    It looks like Home is going Top 10 (at a minimum) on the Triple A radio format which will be P2s natural genre. That’s already very unusual for an Idol and a great sign for his future career..

    The fact that he’s isn’t slick really works for him.I think it would hurt him if he came across as some smooth pageant winner type.

  • TheOther

    Haley Reinhart is there because she needs to salvage her career.  Looking at the poor sales of her debut, she is probably on the fringes with Interscope.

    The real winner of AI is the person who sells.  Phillip is not only close to being a double Platinum selling artist, his EP is still in the BB Top 200.  Whereas everyone else from Season 11 has long drop out.

    Phillip basically promoted the whole summer tour by himself with all the radio interviews he’s done.  And he tends to do well in that environment. 

    To have a mega producer like Steve Lillywhite campaigning to be Phillip’s producer is a huge honor.

  • girlygirltoo

    Well, if Phillip hadn’t won, he would never have been handed “Home”, which means the song probably wouldn’t have gotten recorded, since it doesn’t fit Jessica’s, Joshua’s or Hollie’s styles. It would be a shame if such a good song never got widely heard. 

    And if he hadn’t won, who knows if he would have even gotten signed? I know Jimmy said he would sign him in a heartbeat, but would that really be the case if he had finished 3rd, or 5th, for example? Maybe, maybe not. And even though Phillip genuinely doesn’t seem interested in fame, I doubt that his goal in going on Idol was to end up without a record deal. Even if he had gotten signed, he wouldn’t have gotten nearly as much promo as he is getting now. 

    I don’t think Phillip is particularly any more introspective than David Cook or Kris or Lee – they are all pretty quiet guys, at least when being interviewed. Only David Cook seems to be a natural at giving interviews and being at ease in these situations –Kris and Lee are good at them now, but when they first came off Idol, both guys gave some pretty painful interviews where they’d mumble and not be able to sustain eye contact and just came off as extremely uncomfortable. Both guys are a zillion times better at this stuff now than they were to begin with. So I have no doubt that PP will improve greatly as an interviewee as well as he gets more experienced at doing them.

    As for getting to make the music he wants to make, well, we don’t know yet whether Interscope will really let him do that. The success of “Home” is a double edged sword — on the one hand, you’d think it would give him some leverage in any negotiations about his album, but on the other hand, it will likely make Interscope want to push PP down the path of making an album full of songs that are similar to “Home”, which he clearly does not want to do.

    I know that artistically, it seems like these guys would all be better off without being tied to the major label deal. But on the other hand, it is very very hard to make a real living as an indie musician. These guys will be going from getting 5- or 6-figure guarantees for playing gigs & five- or six-figure advances on their albums to getting minimal to no advances on their album (if they even get signed by a label) to getting much smaller guarantees for their gigs. So it’s definitely a tradeoff and there’s no guarantee that any of these guys will be able to sustain a long career without label support. I hope that they will all be able to do so, because they are all very talented. But there are probably just as many pros & cons to being an indie musician as there are being one signed to a major label.

  • rodolfochengcanepa

    ok i got it wrong, it was a platinum/gold record that he donated 4 the breast cancer collect toghether with 2 signed guitars.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1q1nS3YclQ

  • jpfan2

    “He didn’t say the name of it, or say it is definitely available now on itunes, or mention that he has an album coming out soon”

    People seem to have no problem finding the song on iTunes without P2 hawking it. As I said before I think P2′s ”bashfulness” is working for him. If he did the usual PR salesman thing, he’d come across as a phony which won’t work for the genre of music he’s going for. 

  • girlygirltoo

    I’m not convinced. He didn’t write “Home” and he has repeatedly said it doesn’t represent him as an artist. The song is viable, obviously, but it is still to be determined whether Phillip will be viable as an artist performing his own original music. He could do what David Cook did — getting a coronation song that helped him get major exposure (including Olympics) and building off that to get a platinum album and another big hit single. Or he could do what Kris did, which was have a big hit single that did not translate into major exposure or sales beyond that. In Kris’ case, one big problem is that they had him record using the Script’s original track, rather than allowing him to put his own twist on the song — now, if he had been allowed to do that, maybe it wouldn’t have sold or charted nearly as well, but it would have at least represented him better as an artist. As far as I know, PP was allowed to record his own version of “Home” rather than recording vocals over the original track. But it still doesn’t represent who he is as an artist. It’s very much up in the air whether radio and the public will respond to Phillip’s own music — I would say that it’s la long shot that he will end up going double platinum when he puts out a single he wrote (or co-wrote) himself, although you never know — lightning could strike twice in the same place. I think that his album will sell respectably, assuming it’s any good (which I expect it to be), but I don’t know if it will sell in huge amounts. For me, anyway, it’s a hard call since his genre generally doesn’t sell in huge amounts, but the success of “Home” should give him a boost. I guess I’m still waiting to hear what the album will end up sounding like.

  • littleapple

    PP has kidney stone throughout his life which means he need money to pay medical bills. Winning Idol let him earn money immediately.

    Home does great on the Triple A radio. This format fits PP`s music genre.  Interscope tends to be commercial but doesn`t  mean it isn`t wise. Jimmy`s coronation song choice was better PP`s.

    PP seems to be  naive and immature which hurt his music career. Auditioning for American Idol was his best descion. He won. He has hit song. He changes his life forever. Now he has different view for music industry. He will grow up.

  • Karen C

    So it’s definitely a tradeoff and there’s no guarantee that any of these guys will be able to sustain a long career without label support. I hope that they will all be able to do so, because they are all very talented. But there are probably just as many pros & cons to being an indie musician as there are being one signed to a major label.

    I think the ones who fit this category do have the advantage of their fanbases that remained from the show, and may be enough to maintain a music career even if they’ve been dropped.  Even those from several years ago have been able to do this.

    It will be interesting to see how Phillips album does and if it some of the songs are similar to Home.

  • Anny_nanny

    What it is “platinum/gold”?

  • wkstrack

    P2 is more introspective than Kris and Lee though. He’s SHY. Kris and Lee are not shy guys. Quiet? Laid-back? Yes. Lee might have been portrayed as the shy guy on Idol but he has said that he’s not IRL. I think with all these WGWG getting off idol and doing interviews after it’s going to be new and hence of course they’re going to be uncomfortable. But with Phillip it’s probably going to be a little tougher and more hard work because of his apparent “bashfulness”.

    I heard P2 also gave away his platinum record. Is there any truth to that? Because that’s kinda a WTF? Wouldn’t he want the record for himself? Unless, it’s a copy.

  • wordnerdarchie

    It will be interesting to see how Phillips album does and if it some of the songs are similar to Home.

    I’m really curious what Phillip’s album will sound like if it follows the vibe of Home which the label might push for, or if it goes in a different direction (which Phillip implies since he says that Home isn’t like his music).

    Talking about similarities, it’s been noted in the comment section of “Home” that the song has really strong musical similarities to another song by an indie band, Bronze Radio Return and their song “Rough Town”.  This seems to happen a lot that people are reminded of other songs.  So I checked it out and linked it below.  Does anyone else hear it…. interesting.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJXoCu8hegA

  • Incipit

     He will grow up.

    Very succinct, littleapple, and right to the point.

    The clear light of logic ought to show the holes in the “Phillip doesn’t care about that commercial success.” And it has. He entered this highly commercial competition. For whatever reasons of his own, he stayed when he could have gone, and this is now his life, for the moment.

    IMO, since she is doing interviews too, having Haley with him on an interview is an easy way for Interscope to give him support and guidance while he finds his footing with the media. She ‘gets’ the work that is necessary to be done there. This is “On The Job Training”. Phillip will get better at it.

    And there are not only two choices. Phillip doesn’t have to chose between being someone who didn’t seem caught up in the stats, and reeling them off as if memorized – he doesn’t have to pick between not being slick, and being smooth.

    He can be his naturally charming self, and still take enough interest in his career to learn how to conduct himself on an interview, how to hit the talking points, how to get his message across. All of that is part of his new job; there’s no need for selecting either extreme. 

    And jet lag won’t buy him much slack for long. I’ve no doubt the Idol veterans have been telling him to be prepared to work harder than he ever has in his life…this is part of it. When the album drops, it only gets more intense…but Phillip is in the same position all the winners have been in, and he will learn to adapt to the business part of the music business he chose to get involved with.

     He’ll learn to add the relevant information to an interview if it’s left out, hit the talking points,  charm the media people, avoid/answer awkward questions, make a good soundbite, and take advantage of every media opportunity his management arranges. He’ll probably even learn to make it look easy. After all, in essence, he is paying for it.

    As littleapplle says, he will grow up.

    IMO.

  • jpfan2

    Maybe it’s me but I don’t think handling yourself well in interviews means squat in the end for musicians.  Haley can be a total pro and still not produce music that people want to buy. And someone can be completely inarticulate and still make music that excites people.

  • elliegrll

    I think it means something.  Artists still need to produce music that people want to hear, but they need a way to get that music out to the public, so being good at interviews will endear them to the people who can help distribute their music.  For example, Taylor Swift is very popular among those in radio and the media.  People have always wondered why pop radio program directors don’t have a problem with playing her songs, or why country PDs don’t get upset because she is so pop, I think one of the reasons is because of the way that she treats people in the industry.  I think that the same is true for Carrie Underwood.  

    If someone goes out of his or her way to show that they don’t like doing interviews or photo shoots, then eventually they’ll stop being booked for these things, which will make it harder for them to gain any recognition among potential music buyers.

  • elliegrll

    Labels buy multiple copies of the Platinum records, so that they can hand them out to everyone who was involved in producing the song.  The giveaway was part of a promotion, and was surely one of the extra copies that Interscope ordered.

    I think that there are a lot of similarities between Lee, Phillip and Kris, personality wise.  None of the three enjoy during interviews, but I think that in Philip’s case, his been quicker to come to the realization that this is something that he has to do, if he wants to get his music out to the public.  

  • jpfan2

    I find P2′s shyness to be kind of sweet actually.

    I don’t want to be mean but I don’t think the fact some WGWGs got better at interviews meant much for their careers.  They still struggled to find an audience for their music.

  • wkstrack

    Kris and Lee are not shy. Phillip is. There is a BIG difference between quiet and shy. PP is both. I think it will be tougher and maybe a while before he becomes comfortable in interviews like these.

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    I don’t want to be mean but I don’t think the fact some WGWGs got better at interviews meant much for their careers.  They still struggled to find an audience for their music.

    Well, but presumably they’d have struggled even more if they’d lacked the interview skills to get talk show and radio interview slots. It’s difficult for audiences to connect with music they don’t know about.

    Right now, P2 is riding the wave of “recent Idol winner has news value,” so he’s a lock for plenty of interview slots no matter what he does. Eventually, though, the cycle shifts and winners have to compete for the interview slots on the merits of their charm and the popularity of their music. 

    I suppose it’s possible that P2′s jazz/acoustic rock will end up being the kind of radio smashes that make him “news” even if he doesn’t interview well. But if I were trying to go into a niche radio genre, with the record of difficulty that Idol winners have in getting ongoing radio play, I’d want solid interview skills in my back pocket, just in case.

  • Incipit

     They still struggled to find an audience for their music.

    Yes, I read the Numbers threads, jpfan2. Everyone except a few at the top are struggling to find an audience for their music. It isn’t mean, that’s just the present state of the industry.

    And that’s a shame, but I”m not sure what you are saying? Getting a rep for being a bad interview wouldn’t matter? Learning how to deal with the Media isn’t important to future publicity? Publicity doesn’t matter to sales? 

    You have lost me here. What is your premise? It seems like – “Hey, you’re doomed no matter what, so just give up”. But I don’t think that’s what you mean to say. Is it?

  • Pippygirl

    I’m sincerely not sure why Kris is being lumped in with Phillip and Lee as this shy, awkward interviewee.  He may have had a few bad interview at the beginning but he very quickly began to do more than fine imo. His interviews with Leno and Fallon after his win were positively adorable (of course much of that has to do with the skill of those interviewers). Kris has done stints as a deejay for radio stations which he also handled well. I’ve also heard him give off the cuff answers to crazy questions that radio deejays threw at him without a problem.  I think he comes across as extremely charming.

    That being said, I don’t think it means a whole hell of a lot out in the real world of music ;).

  • irockhard

    If James can overcome his Asperger’s awkwardness in interviews, which he has, then Philip can overcome his shyness. Philip a year on, after many more interviews, will be totally different to the Philip we see now.

  • Karen C

    Talking about similarities, it’s been noted in the comment section of “Home” that the song has really strong musical similarities to another song by an indie band, Bronze Radio Return and their song “Rough Town”. This seems to happen a lot that people are reminded of other songs. So I checked it out and linked it below. Does anyone else hear it…. interesting.

    It sounds a little similar in the chorus but the rest really isn’t at all like Home.   I really liked it though,   and they’re near me so I’m glad to find out about them :)

  • irockhard

    I don’t understand how they still haven’t gotten her out on a real tour. Casey James and Casey Abrams are both touring and their album sales are even lower than hers. So I think low sales might not be the/only issue.

  • http://twitter.com/Miztig Miz

    Haley is bubbly. Phillip is Sunday afternoon laid back.

    Impossible to predict how Phil’s debut album will do since we have no clue what it will be. I wish him well.

  • rodolfochengcanepa

    1.5M copies (i guess).

  • Karen C

    I think that other new artists are more trained in how to handle interviews before their albums are released.  I know Taylor Swift and other new artists had development deals for years before their albums out, so they might have either been themselves better prepared for possible stardom, or else their management gave them some training.

    For the winning Idols, within only a few months of even knowing they’ll be on the show, they have major interviews, and a few months later, a major album release. Also, most haven’t lived in a major entertainment city before they went on Idol. 

  • TheOther

    Look at how far Carrie Underwood has grown when it comes to interviews.  In as far as Kris and Lee, they were also older than Phillip at the time.  In fact, all the guys were except for Scotty.  I thought Phillip did great on Leno, same with Live With Kelly.  Same with many of the radio tours.   

     

  • justmefornow

    Sales are only part of the issue with touring, I believe. 
    Don’t they have to find a touring mate that is willing to take them on also, agree to tour with them.
    I’d think James’s pretty good early sales numbers convinced Buckcherry to let them tour with them. Drowning Pool, however, was convinced by performance ability, crowd response, later on it.

    I think there are several factors that play into that touring decision.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/XDQP2Y46M5B3OHOKALDDGDHQCM Leandro

    Why P2 has to overcome his shyness? His shyness didn’t stop him to win American Idol and get a double platinum song. Also, people say his shyness is his charm. He’s so naturally lucky that he could do interviews sleeping and he’d still be successful.

  • nyc57

    I remember being a little surprised how funny and relaxed Kris was,not only on Leno and Fallon,but also on Ellen and Regis.The other thing that kris is very good at is interacting with the audience during concerts.He seems to love it and is often very funny.I went to one of his first concerts at Mechanics Hall and he was completely relaxed and funny.

  • Mateja Praznik

    Just wait. Once a new Idol winner is crowned, Phillip will be old news. Most likely he will fade away just like Cook, Allen and DeWyze.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/XDQP2Y46M5B3OHOKALDDGDHQCM Leandro

    Wow! Why this harsh prediction? Just because P2 plays a guitar? It seems a little bit unfair (and I’m not even a fan). If he can get more hit songs there’s no reason for that. It’s most likely that some runners-up and a third place non-WGWG with fanbases but without hit songs will fade away before P2.

  • Karen C

    Hmm, have they faded away? I still hear plenty about them.  And if Phillip continues the way he has he should do pretty well also.

  • blackberryharvest

     There’s no way of predicting that. If he has quality music and continues to do well with his songs like he has with “Home,” then he can continue to do well. Just because he is a WGWG doesn’t mean he will flop or be forgotten about. It all comes down to the material and whether radio is going to support him. He is already on the right track with a near double platinum single. And I’m not even a fan of his.

  • elliegrll

    Everybody’s situation is different, and so is Phillip’s.  Their race, gender and the ability to play a guitar didn’t play a role in why any of these people lost their recording contracts.  If Phillip has the support of his label, gets the support from radio, and releases music that people want to hear and buy, then he will be in a good position.

  • getaway1

    How exactly have Cook, Allen, Dewyze faded away?  All are active in the business; doing what they love.  This includes Taylor Hicks.

    Rewind to May.  Phil was predicted to the be worse selling winner of all time.  It was also predicted that Home would tank after the first week post finale. Then it was predicted that once the Olympics are done, Home would be done.

    We all know now that none of this happened.

  • Mateja Praznik

    Look, I’ve seen how it went with all three guys. The all started their post Idol careers differently. Cook was so popular, had so much momentum. 3 hits, platinum album … And once he started touring, he fell off the face of the Earth. By the time Kris won season 8, Cook was done. Kris had very little momentum and only managed one hit. Lee was dead on arrival and we all knew it.

    Unless Phillip somehow gets several more hits and radioplay, I think he will eventually end up as the other three.
     

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/XDQP2Y46M5B3OHOKALDDGDHQCM Leandro

    Well, the runners-up have a shot almost as good as the winners. All the last 5 runners-up are non-WGWG and all of them aren’t doing better (or much better) than the winners – Jessica isn’t doing anything, actually, since she doesn’t even have a single out there. 

    The only inference that I can make with these facts is that each time it’s more and more difficult to sell records and succeed in the music industry, despite the fact you are a white guy playing a guitar or not.

    We might sit down on a very comfortable chair if we’re waiting for a winner so comercially successful as Carrie or Kelly, despite music style, gender, race or whatever.

  • getaway1

    Unless Phillip somehow gets several more hits and radioplay, I think he will eventually end up as the other three.

    But that applies to everyone. And not just limited to people who won or play the guitar.  If Interscope had to cut Idols at this point, Haley would be the first to go.

  • Anny_nanny

    At the moment it’s the empty can that makes the most noise.

  • Mateja Praznik

    No one from Idol has a shot at the moment. 19 sucks and can’t do anything for them. Interscope isn’t any better than RCA. The Idol machine is weak.

  • Incipit

    Cook was so popular, had so much momentum. 3 hits, platinum album … And once he started touring, he fell off the face of the Earth.  By the time Kris won season 8, Cook was done.

    Whoah, Mateja Praznick. I know it’s one of those things “everybody says”…but it isn’t true. Facts don’t bear it out. The Handy Dandy List of Appearances for 2009, (while DC was touring almost that whole year) shows Twenty Seven appearances on Network TV, VH1, etc.. all but nine of them AFTER Kris Allen won Season 8. The next two years also have itemized appearance lists. 

    “Come Back To Me” went Gold on September 22, 2010 – at that point it’s four months past the Season 9 Finale, and Lee DeWyze winning..in May 2010. So no…it’s not at all true that David was “done” by the time Kris won in 2009. Heck, he’s still being played on the radio recurrent lists in 2012.

    I don’t follow the other two winners, but this complete misconception of ‘one year and done’ is so common, I figure their ‘real’ story is different too.

    As you say, they all started differently – but the present marketplace has not only been unkind to people who win Idol, or play the guitar. IMO, that’s not the culprit, everyone, including Phillip, needs hits and radio play…nor is it that easy to pinpoint one factor in the market. 

    Unless it’s PD’s and Corporate Radio Monopolies. I’m always up to blame everything on them. *snerk*

  • blackberryharvest

     

    No one from Idol has a shot at the moment. 19 sucks and can’t do
    anything for them. Interscope isn’t any better than RCA. The Idol
    machine is weak.

    That’s not true. 19/Interscope does way better than any of the other singing shows out there. I have been very impressed with how they have handled Home so far. I would say the contestants from idol at least have a better shot than the X Factor alumni and (especially) The Voice alumni. The X Factor’s winner has barely made ANY appearances since she won.

    I think we need to give the “machine” credit with how they have handled Phillip and the S10 country twins so far.

  • irockhard

    Has a shot at what? Being a superstar? Ya know radio is way more consolidated now than it was in the early years of Idol. Not everyone whats to do dance pop, country or hip hop. A lot of this stuff is out of the machine’s hands.

    I would argue that Interscope is a little better than RCA, they seem to be more patient but 19 is awful. The management arm should just do what the recording arm does – lease the alums to other management comps who actually know what they’re doing and get a cut.

  • irockhard

    And this too!

  • suenigma

    Nevermind. Misunderstood comment.

  • shell29

    The X Factor’s winner has barely made ANY appearances since she won.

    Her album doesn’t come out until December so I’m guessing there will be a lot more promo lined up for her to coincide with the release and the new season of X Factor.  We’ll probably be seeing more of Melanie, Chris, Marcus and perhaps some of the other X Factor US alums during season two.

    As for “Home”, I’m still more inclined to give the lion’s share of the credit for its success to the song itself and the fantastic exposure it received during the Olympic games.  That Olympic exposure was the spark and it’s been going strong ever since.  No way this song gets anywhere near double platinum without that exposure.  It’s a nice feather in his cap but it remains to be seen if his album and future singles will be successful.

  • http://twitter.com/makeFigure8s Just Me!

    Haley watching Philip perform
    http://yhoo.it/QnMUFQ

  • Incipit

    Nice picture, Just Me!. Neat how the members of the Idol seasons are supportive of each other. IMO.

  • p2fan

    Do not forget PP has serendipity on his side.

  • girlygirltoo

    Melanie’s got 2 singles out, yet doesn’t appear to be doing any appearances to promote them. Is her label going to send her on a radio tour? Likewise, Chris Rene’s EP comes out in a few days, yet I’ve seen pretty much zero promo for it. Aside from having them appear on XF, I’m starting to wonder if they are going to get any type of big promotional push. There’s pretty much zero buzz about any of these guys right now.

  • Mateja Praznik

    When season 8 finale came around, it was already clear that both Davids were fading away. Cook’s appearance on that finale felt like the final goodbye, and not just as the reigning champ. He still had one current song on the radio that summer, but only on HAC radio and it didn’t sell gold until a year later.

    Sadly, season 8 TOP 2 followed the same path. Nothing was done to keep these guys relevant for more than a year after the end of their seasons.

    Season 9 TOP 2 were both dead on arrival.

  • Karen C

    Cook appeared twice a year for the next 2 years on the show, and once last year.  He appeared on major shows  as of last year, and still did a tour, and has done several shows this year, including a very popular Asian tour.  I hardly think that’s fading away, I realize his second album didn’t do well, but he still has a good sized fanbase, and is still heard on the radio quite a bit.

    And Adam Lambert is still promoting his album internationally, and in the US.  He’s also pretty well known and has made quite a few tv apperances. ETA: And just appeared on the Voice China…
     
    Relevance is more than just them being high on the pop charts. 

    ETA: And they are all still working as musicians, and have a big enough audience to do so.

  • Mateja Praznik

     I know that Cook appeared on Idol twice during season 8 and that he appeared in later seasons. It’s just that after season 8 finale, every time he shows up, it like: “Who is this? Cook? He is still alive?”

    It’s not just about being relevant on the pop charts (but it’s the most desirable), it’s about being relevant on any chart and having new songs on the radio, not just recurrents from 2008 and 2009.

    These shows are supposed to launch relevant major label recording artists and while it’s understandable that many might not stay around for long, it’s sad to see all of them struggle with sophomore releases.

  • Karen C

    First of all, people are interested when he’s on the show, even those that don’t usually follow him. They’re interested even outside the idol bubble when he makes an appearance, even now when he does a charity event or national anthem at a sporting event. 

    And he did have 2 songs chart last year on HAC.  Yes, it could have and should have been higher, but thats still charting and getting some airplay.

    And again, relevance in music is more than just charting or being on the radio.  It also means making music that means something to your fanbase, which he has done and continues to do.

    Idol has kind of become a double edged sword, because some artists that wouldn’t have been considered mainstream get an audience from the show, as well as their own audience but then there is a dropoff, but the fans of the artist’s music are those that remain, and they have a bigger fanbase than they might have had otherwise. 

    Also, very few artists even outside of Idol who have had very successful albums repeat this on their second album.  Especially in pop, where music changes so fast.

  • Incipit

    Mateja Praznick, I’m not going to dispute with you about your opinion, I just disagree with some of your conclusions. I only ever quibble about facts. Or opinions stated as facts.

    I do have to note that you’re using a tricksy measuring stick, dinging anyone for not having songs on the radio, when the radio won’t play the songs, no matter what their quality. That’s a Catch 22.  

    I don’t want artists to have to cave in and crawl into one of the three available radio boxes, Country, Dance/Pop, or Rap, just to get that radio play, I would rather artists could sing the style of music they connect with, whatever that may be, and let a listener decide. But, it doesn’t work that way…so it’s good that Terrestrial Corporate Radio isn’t the only option to hear or sell music. Especially good for me, since I don’t like/buy Country, Dance/Pop or Rap.

    Karen C said anything else I may have said – Except – there’s a lot broken about the current set-up – and the industry is not in good shape. That any artists can “keep working as musicians, and have a big enough audience to do so.” is a winning situation. When I wish these folks good fortune every season, I am also wishing that they can retain their love of music, and that the Industry doesn’t swallow them alive..

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “These shows are supposed to launch relevant major label recording
    artists
    and while it’s understandable that many might not stay around
    for long, it’s sad to see all of them struggle with sophomore releases.”

    I agree. The bolded part states the kind of artists (“superstars”) that Idol claims to want to “discover”, and over the years, it’s become increasingly apparent that achieving this goal is very difficult. However, although only a few of Idols have been able to transition from reality show contestant to established mainstream recording artist, many Idols have achieved various levels of success in pursuing performing careers and earning a good living, while fading from the mainstream spotlight. So, “success” from the POV of the AI and their goals is different from the “success” that many Idols have managed achieve.

  • Caro3278sweet

    Do not forget PP has serendipity on his side.

    Well, Lee not only had serendipity on his side, he had sweet serendipity. And look where that got him. ;-)

  • Caro3278sweet

    I was listening to Bob Kingsley’s Country Top 40 this morning and they had an interview with Casey James before they played his song. He spoke right to this conversation we’re having. His idea of success, he said, is when he’s able to play his music and make enough money to eat and have a place to live. He said he’d been doing that before AI and he’s doing it now, just on a bigger scale. To him, that’s success. 

    I would expect that Cookie and Kris and Lee and P2 would all say the same thing. None of these guys strikes me as being particularly sad or worried about their career trajectory. 

    As a side note, Kingsley called Casey James a “rising star”. It will be really interesting to see where Casey’s sophomore album goes. Because he’s definitely played it differently than the typical AI alum. But being a fan, I’m just happy he’s “successful”. ;-)

  • thirdtime

    It’s a nice dream to want Idol to create superstars out of all these kids, but it’s really not realistic.  11 seasons – winners and runners up – we wish many of them would have become the next big thing – but think about how many we are talking about.  At least the winner of each season?  Meaning we expected at least 11 superstars to come out of this show?  I actually think Idol’s track record is pretty amazing.  Several that I would call superstars – many that I would call stars – and tons of former Idols making a living in the music business with doors open to them that would not have been prior to Idol (like Kat McPhee and Constantine Maroulis).  I’m not sure how much more any reality TV singing competition could do than Idol has done to launch careers.

  • girlygirltoo

    I always get hung up on the phrase “relevant artist,” because not all artists who I would consider relevant in terms of putting out great music are commercial successes. Many of them get very little, if any, radio play and don’t sell huge numbers of singles or albums. Yet they get great reviews, win awards and are name checked as influences on other artists. Many of them have hardcore fanbases who are crazy loyal, who wouldn’t desert them just because they don’t have a platinum album or aren’t being played on the radio.

    On the other hand, there are several artists who are big commercial success who I would only consider relevant because of their sales. Their music is mediocre and/or disposable. A lot of these type of artists end up having short careers — or at least, short stays in the spotlight.

    So in terms of the Idol contestants, I would say that they can be relevant artists without having a lot of commercial success. It’s easier, sure, if lots of people are exposed to your music, but it isn’t a requirement to making great music or being considered relevant.

  • jpfan2

    Obviously Idol is in a new era and no one really expects a Pop superstar to emerge from the show.  It’s still has a great record in establishing artists of various success. Obviously being articulate and good at interviews is a big plus.

    But IMHO P2 shyness isn’t a deal breaker for his particular genre.  It is funny in an ironic way to see Haley so attached to the Idol machine. Wasn’t her story line about how the show was “unfair” to her?

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    Reality TV doesn’t make musical superstars – labels do.  If RCA invested as much money into anybody as they invested in Kelly Clarkson – they would make a superstar.

    If PP’s label shells out the dough to promote him to the radio and his management continue pushing his music to advertisers/TV shows/movies then he will do just fine.  If they leave him dangling in the wind like RCA did with Lee’s debut – he will repeat Lee’s fate.

    Making superstars is not about the music, it’s about the money.

  • snow_ghost

    I have to agree with the people who say a lot of Home’s sales are due to the Olympics and the success story of the women’s gymnastics team.   But having said that, Phillip does a good job with the song.    If P2 wants to go the AAA format for his album, I don’t think we can expect big numbers for him for sales because unless his songs crossover to top 40, he won’t get a lot of exposure.   That doesn’t mean he won’t put out a great album.   It’s just a tough climb for all artists now, not just AI contestants. Man it is tough getting airplay on Top 40 and it isn’t always about the quality of the music.

    I think the industry has changed so much that artists now need to diversfy and find other ways to find audiences for their music.    There is a reason some many stars want to be judges on singing competitions now. Artists also need to get their music played other places besides radio. The Olympics and the Clint Eastwood movie were a good start for HOME.

  • jpfan2

    “If RCA invested as much money into anybody as they invested in Kelly Clarkson – they would make a superstar”

     Labels only invest in artists with financial potential otherwise they’d be out of business. If the public doesn’t respond, that future superstar is out on the street pronto. One sign that the public doesn’t care are songs that get played on the radio but have lousy sales. Home is in the opposite camp. It’s radio play is okay but its sales are stellar!

  • http://twitter.com/HaleysShindig HaleysShindig

    Great interview. I really love these 2 Idols. Both are doing a lot better than they were a couple years ago. Phil, working in his Dad’s Pawn shop and Haley a part-time student and life guard. Love what Idol has done for both of them and giving them their dreams to make a living making music. 

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “I actually think Idol’s track record is pretty amazing.  Several that I
    would call superstars – many that I would call stars – and tons of
    former Idols making a living in the music business with doors open to
    them that would not have been prior to Idol (like Kat McPhee and
    Constantine Maroulis).  I’m not sure how much more any reality TV
    singing competition could do than Idol has done to launch careers.”

    I agree. From the perspective of “success” in the entertainment business, lots of Idols fulfill that definition and the track record of Idol is indeed impressive.

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    If RCA invested as much money into anybody as they invested in Kelly Clarkson – they would make a superstar.

    Traditionally, the major cost of breaking an artist is radio promotion. The big Justice Department crackdown on payola circa 2006 had an important consequence: labels still funnel financial favors to radio stations… but they can no longer require that the radio stations give them anything for it. (Yes, this should be a candidate for World’s Most Inefficient Bribery System. No, I don’t know how Clear Channel’s “Of course you can pay us to get play every hour for your artist!” deal gets around the law.) So no, spending massive amounts of money on an artist isn’t a secure route to superstardom.

    In any case, the Massive Promo Spending approach was tried just last year with Lana del Rey, and she hasn’t done well in the U.S. at all. We-the-public notice the massive promo campaigns that work but it’s easy to forget the ones that fail.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “Reality TV doesn’t make musical superstars – labels do.  If RCA
    invested as much money into anybody as they invested in Kelly Clarkson -
    they would make a superstar.”

    You’re right, labels are in the position to make musical superstars, but it takes more than just label support to make “anybody” a superstar (e.g. Nicole Schlezinger).

    “Making superstars is not about the music, it’s about the money.”

    I only agree in part. Yes, without the strong support of a label, no one would be super successful (= “superstar”), but the music does have to connect to an audience at a “mainstream” level (= great commercial success), and that involves a lot beyond just the money or promotion. There are superstars who have both great label support and great talent, ones who have great label support and average/mediocre singing ability but other qualities that allow them to connect with enough of an audience to make them a “superstar”. Then, there are breakthrough artists who connect with a mainstream audience (e.g. Adele), which then fosters support from the label in a positive sort of feedback cycle that snowballs.

    Idols are in a strange position in that they initially attract a large audience (albeit based on them being reality show contestants), and then are faced with establishing themselves in the music industry, with many/most of them having to do that based on music that may bear little resemblance to what they did on the show. Add to that a viewer/votership who may not be fans of the kind of music that the contestants wants to produce post-Idol, and it’s no wonder that so many Idol alums have difficulty establishing themselves beyond the show.

    Ultimately, although the “money” is of key importance, it’s not enough and not that simple.

    ETA: Eilonwy wrote:
    “In any case, the Massive Promo Spending approach was tried just last year with Lana del Rey, and she hasn’t done well in the U.S. at all. We-the-public notice the massive promo campaigns that work but it’s easy to forget the ones that fail.”

    Another good example of it not just being about the money.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “The Olympics and the Clint Eastwood movie were a good start for HOME.”

    Small correction – “Home” was only used for a trailer for the Clint Eastwood movie, the song was not in the movie itself.

  • TheOther

    Return on investment goes hand in hand with good promotion opportunities.  Each time Phillip performed Home in a large venue, whether it was the MLB All-Stars game, the 4th of July at the Capitol, the Today/Kelly/Ellen shows, he enjoyed a nice bump in sales.

    From a timing perspective, especially now that he has to work on his CD, Interscope has gotten the song to the point where it is enjoying consistent support from radio.

    Unfortunately for Lee Dewyze, it was basically over for him before he even got started. He got blamed for the poor tour results and there was the whole Nigel keeping him out of the finale controversy.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    You really think that Adele success is not bought? And Santa is real…

    Anyway, although you may not always make a superstar by throwing money at someone, you can NEVER make a superstar WITHOUT money, period. 

  • http://twitter.com/KariannHart Kariann Hart

    I agree.  From the perspective of “success” in the entertainment business, lots of Idols fulfill that definition and the track record of Idol is indeed impressive.

    ITA.  It excites me when I read of Idol alum success.  Yes, selling albums is the best indicator od musical success.  However, when Taylor Hicks makes $3,000,000 and is doing work he loves – that’s success.  When any of them appear in a TV series, Broadway, modeling, commericals, etc. they are also successful!

    Why can’t a label compromise with allowing the artists to put 2-3 of their songs onto an album?

  • thirdtime

    I’m not sure who your comment was directed at, since I didn’t see any comments here that suggested a superstar can be made without any promo money.  After all, how would we even know about these people at all without promo.  Maybe I missed something.  But I do agree with fuzzywuzzy who said that it takes more than money for someone to make it big, there also has to be a connection with the public.  If you are suggesting that Adele’s success was the product of JUST money being pumped into her career, I definitely have to disagree.  Adele connected with people big time with her music, which in turn made her label see there was demand, and so they then pumped more money into her promo.  As someone else said, the label needs to feel confident they will get a return on their investment before they will spend the money.  And even then there is no guarantee it will work.  But the demand needs to be there first. 

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    Why can’t a label compromise with allowing the artists to put 2-3 of their songs onto an album?

    Since recent Idol alum who write songs have had 7 or more cowrites on their albums, I’m not sure how reducing the number to 3 would be a helpful compromise.

    If the idea is that Idol alums’ songs are inferior to what could be written for them… mmm… there are a lot of songs written by “hitmakers” that don’t turn out to be hits. And the track record of commissioned songs for Idol albums is all over the place — some of the songs are good, some are drek, some did well, some flopped. I don’t think the answer to promoting Idols is as simple as insisting that other people write for them, especially as Clarkson, Underwood and Daughtry have hits with songs they participated in writing.

  • irockhard

    Which only goes to show why artists and labels need to stop depending on radio.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    So, you expect people to connect with the song that they haven’t heard? How would that work, exactly?

  • thirdtime

    They all start somewhere, even if it’s locally before they are “discovered”.  It sounded like you were saying in your original comment that money alone can buy a successful career.  All I’m saying is there has to be some kind of demand from the public there to start with and if there is, then people are willing to back them up with the money.  Don’t you agree? Maybe I misunderstood what you were trying to say about Adele.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    I am saying that you cannot have “superstar” music career without money. Even if you are Adele.

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    Which only goes to show why artists and labels need to stop depending on radio.

    Well, sure… but what do they depend on for mass distribution instead? Youtube is the other major distribution path (I can link the survey results on music discovery again, if anybody cares)… but aside from a small number of highly viral videos, the mass hits on Youtube tend to go to artists who are also getting substantial radio play.

    Television or movie placements obviously have some value in building interest and thus goosing the Youtube numbers and sales, so there’s that. It works best when there’s frequent and intense repetition, as in P2′s Olympics placement. And there are bands like OK Go who get financial mileage and PR (though not massive sales) from corporate sponsorship.

    Winning Idol is probably one of the most effective ways to get a one-time HUGE sales boost without substantial radio play (well, Lee DeWyze might beg to differ, but it usually works)… but without radio, the boost is good for only one album, max.

    As things stand, “stop depending on radio” means “lose your biggest driver of sales.” Major labels carry appalling levels of debt that have to be covered by their already declining sales revenues. Part of the reason there’s so little money for true artist development is that labels are running scared on debt coverage — the bad decisions that got us where we are today didn’t come from A&R but from the Chief Financial Officers’ suites.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    I think that you may be responding to part of my post. No, I do not think that Adele’s success was bought because of the route that she took to her massive success, as I posted. But, certainly once her label realized that her music was connecting with more and more people, they ramped up promotion (invested more money in her because they realized the potential commercial success). Still, I think that success stories like Adele are very rare, so don’t necessarily fit with a general pattern.

    “Anyway, although you may not always make a superstar by throwing money
    at someone, you can NEVER make a superstar WITHOUT money, period.”

    Which is consistent with what I posted, but very different from your initial statement which was this:

    If RCA invested as much money into anybody as they invested in Kelly Clarkson – they would make a superstar.
    …….
    Making superstars is not about the music, it’s about the money.

    Here, you stated that “anybody” would be a superstar if enough money was invested in them by their label, which is clearly not true (examples given previously). Obviously, money (=promotion, radioplay) is necessary for any artist to have their music exposed and connect to the public, but after a certain point, no amount of money can make anyone a star, let alone a “superstar”. So, it’s not just about “money”, the “product” is of key importance too.

     

  • TheOther

    Record labels are businesses and they can’t survive without sustaining a profit, irregardless of how talented or good a singer someone is.  Most Idols do get some initial investment (promotion), but if they can’t make a return on investment quick enough, the label can’t just keep throwing money out there.

    The Phillip/Haley pairing is a good example of that. Haley is a nice person.  She’s a good singer.  She did a good job with the interview.  But unfortunately her sales have not catch on quick enough.  So Interscope’s promotion will continue more with Phillip, because he has made Jimmy Iovine enough money with Home for them to be able to do that.

  • Karen C

    Most Idols do get some initial investment (promotion), but if they can’t make a return on investment quick enough, the label can’t just keep throwing money out there.

    In some cases, I think the money is being spent incorrectly, and that is part of the problem.  Instead of the label having the ones that are rock singer- songwriters write with pop cowriters, why not let them develop their music the way they want to and then promote the music they do create to the audience that would like them, then they would have more money to do so.  I think that is part of what has gone wrong recently, and it looks like it might be with Phillip also, if that ad was what they were looking for.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    If labels were efficient businesses they wouldn’t have so many failures, which are always blamed on the artists. 

    Of course, unsophisticated public buys all the stories that artist didn’t connect, when it is label that didn’t put artist in front of the right audience.

    Oh, well, real artists will survive and will find their audience, however small, while manufactured ones will go away eventually.

  • jpfan2

    “You really think that Adele success is not bought? And Santa is real…”
     
    Who knew labels could ”buy” sucess for Adele. Since they did that for some over wieght chick from England shouldn’t they use their super powers for some under achieving kareoke show contestants. ;0.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    You mean that the label spent NO money whatsoever on promoting Adele worldwide? 

    Putting songs/albums on i-tunes with banners  in all the different countries cost money. Putting out (positive) press about Adele in all the different countries cost money.  Getting the songs played on the radio to make people aware of Adele in all the different countries cost money (note that other countries don’t have laws against payola like US, so you can literally buy radio play).  Yes, Adele phenomenon was a brilliant piece of marketing, starting with the choice of songs, first promotion in UK where people were nostalgic for this kind of sound (with the death of Amy Whinehouse) and then moving to US and to the world.  

    So, yeah, Adele success cost her label pretty penny.  Without money she would just be a singer known only in UK, like many other UK artists are.

  • Karen C

    I think that Adele’s  extreme success shows that to some extent, that there is an audience for different kinds of music than what was currently in pop in the US.  Maybe in the UK they are more open to promoting various types of music, and for new artists, than they are in the US right now.

  • jpfan2

    “You mean that the label spent NO money whatsoever on promoting Adele worldwide” 

    You mean spending any money on an artist on your label is equivalent to “buying” success for them. If only it were that simple ;0 Anyone with an iTunes banner and a radio single should be a superstar!

    I’m not sure the label bought Adele’s success with her first or second album. The Grammy she won for Best New Artist for her first album probably helped as well!

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    Labels do not spend money on all their artists equally, so yeah, they are “buying” success for some of their artist and leave other artists struggling.

    As far as Grammy’s, Milli Vanilli have one… enough said.

  • http://twitter.com/eilonwya10 Eilonwy

    Putting songs/albums on i-tunes with banners  in all the different countries cost money.

    Well yes, except that it doesn’t. The myth that iTunes banners are bought has been put to rest many times. I don’t have the link, but I’m sure somebody does. iTunes decides what songs and albums it wants to give banners to. If there’s a quid pro quo at all, it’s usually in the form of letting iTunes sell exclusive content.

    That some money must be spent to promote an artist properly does not automatically mean that throwing a large enough amount of money at any artist guarantees superstardom. If there was a tight logical connection, labels would keep a small roster of artists, spend hugely on them, and call it done. In fact, some artists who get big bucks flop, while others with modest budgets happen to hit well and thus generate non-paid news that floats their sales upwards.

    Appropriately, P2′s Home probably hasn’t had a huge promo budget other than its push to radio. The Idol studio cuts are made pretty cheaply. The Olympics placement was pure luck and didn’t cost Interscope a cent. The American Family Insurance placement and the Trouble With The Curve trailer/commercial placement probably were arranged by P2′s management and also didn’t cost Interscope anything. I don’t know what they’ve done in the way of direct advertising, but they’ve also had the advantage that the most recent Idol winner gets coverage as news.

  • http://twitter.com/shoriagirl Shoriagirl

    “The Olympics placement was pure luck” 
    Amusing that general public believes anything that is published.  Just pure luck, of course! LOL

  • standtotheright

    No, you’re right, 19R had so much foresight that they convinced NBC to hire a long term sports segment producer before American Idol ever aired, and before Interscope was the major label of record, just so that they could hire his daughter, who could then make personal appeals/funnel money under the table so that NBC would use the song for Olympics coverage even though it had no merit on its own.

    Or, there was a little serendipity involved with the song being popular/well-received in the first place and also having the particular structure that worked so well for sports montages that NBC would keep using it.

    Not every song would be received that well. Essentially your argument is that with enough money, labels can always make fetch happen, and sometimes fetch is just not going to happen.

  • springboard2

    Anyway, my point is that you cannot expect idols or any other artist to
    become a superstar without monetary investment. So, returning back to
    PP, if his label will care to spend money on his promotion, he will be
    successful, if they don’t, he will not be.

    I don’t agree. If labels were able to make any artist a superstar, they would because it would make them a lot of money, but they don’t. What would stop them if they could?
    They also usually invest gradually in those who have shown potential.  For example Adele was initially launched on triple A, and her overwhelming success on the format lead to a push on the larger and more costly HAC and POP. When the initial reception is good, they invest more, and if it pushes the artist to the next level they keep going.
    But artists do not all get the same response, hence the different levels of investment.

  • Karen C

    I agree to some extent, but I also think that record companies don’t invest as much in the Idols.  They can promote an artist who is totally unknown into being a star,  but when it comes to the Idols, who are relatively pretty well known, they don’t seem to get as much of a push, especially after the first album.

  • springboard2

    May be because most of them don’t have the potential, and considering the sophomores, not just from Idol, but also X Factor UK alums, I strongly believe that it is the case. 
    They are somewhat talented, but it is not enough to have a career as a recording artist, although some are able to branch out to other parts of the music industry, with small gigs, musical theater or else, and they still have a headstart compared to other artists.  

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “Anyway, my point is that you cannot expect idols or any other artist to
    become a superstar without monetary investment.”

    Duh. A totally different point to your original one that spending tons of money is all that is required to make “anybody” a superstar. That the music (product) doesn’t matter.

    “So, returning back to
    PP, if his label will care to spend money on his promotion, he will be
    successful, if they don’t, he will not be.”

    No, not necessarily. You are still arguing that a label spending money on the promotion of an artist will guarantee success, which is not true. Yes, monetary investment in an artist is (usually) necessary for success, but monetary investment in an artist does not guarantee success. All bears are animals, but not all animals are bears.

  • fuzzywuzzy

    “They also usually invest gradually in those who have shown potential. 
    For example Adele was initially launched on triple A, and her
    overwhelming success on the format lead to a push on the larger and more
    costly HAC and POP. When the initial reception is good, they invest
    more, and if it pushes the artist to the next level they keep going.”

    Exactly. It was a positive feedback loop that snowballed.

  • standtotheright

    They are somewhat talented, but it is not enough to have a career as a recording artist

    I’d amend that to say “it is not enough to have a career as a recording artist when the contract is structured to assume that every album release goes gold or better.” Plenty of them would have survived just fine with more reasonably structured contracts.