Bucky Covington Responds to Theft Allegations

A Florida promoter is accusing Season 5 Idol alum, Bucky Covington of stealing $1,500  during a 4th of July weekend concert at the Iron Horse Saloon in Ormond Beach  on June 30 as part of a July 4 NASCAR race week celebration. Read the TMZ report HERE.

Bucky responded today via twitter:

Hey Guys and Gals, I’m sure most of you have seen the news on TMZ. This story is absolutely false in every way. I would never  steal anything from anyone. I did not get paid, but went on to play my full show and had a great time performing for fans! I thank all of you for your continued support! – Bucky

The promoter filed a police report, alleging that Bucky instructed his brother and sister-in-law to steal money from the cash box after the promoter was rushed to a nearby hospital with chest pains. Read the police report HERE. The promoter alleges there were witnesses to the deed.

Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? Not crazy–sleazy promoters trying to short the talent. I have a feeling there is more to this story than meets the eye.

  • Pam

    Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? Not crazy–sleazy promoters trying to short the talent. I have a feeling there is more to this story than meets the eye.

    It really does. I read the police report that you posted yesterday. I think there is more to this story as well. I hope the whole truth eventually comes out.

  • happyhexer

    Am posting what I posted in the earlier thread. Feel free to delete that post.

    Hmm. “[N]o contract or paper exists that would allow x, y, or z to steal this money.” Umm, you don’t need a contract to steal money, just a lack of morals. This sentence doesn’t say anything useful. It doesn’t say whether there was or wasn’t a contract, or what provisions might or might not have been in the contract.

    The promoter doesn’t know what happened; he was in the hospital at the time. It might have gone down as claimed, or the promoter’s employees might have seen an opportunity to line their pockets and throw the blame on outsiders. Hopefully police will investigate and find out the truth. The Rocky DWS incident, if true, does make one look askance at the morals of the Covington clan. Still, trying to protect Rocky from a DWS charge when he was involved in an accident that likely wasn’t his fault (given that he was rear-ended), although slimy and showing a bent to bend the truth, was a defensive move, and does not automatically mean that the Covington brothers would act affirmatively to steal money in this instance.

    That is why evidence of “prior bad acts” are inadmissible in most states. You want a jury to base its decision on whether sufficient evidence was presented that the defendant is guilty of the charged crime, not on whether the defendant is a bad person generally, because he has done bad stuff in the past. Now, if a defendant has previously been convicted of a crime, s/he can be impeached with that conviction if s/he chooses to testify, assuming the prior conviction isn’t so old as to be stale and moldy.

    I don’t know what the truth is, and I don’t want to speculate beyond my surmise that I smell shades of gray here.

  • happyhexer

    One other thing. An article in The Boot reported that the promoter returned from the hospital to find $1,500 missing. That would make me suspect that the four employees used the promoter’s absence to pull a fast one, then banded together to blame the Covingtons. On the other hand, Bucky mentions not getting paid, so sounds like there could have been a fee dispute.

    Really don’t know what happened; hope the truth comes out, whatever it might be.

  • Listening

    So all the witnesses worked for the promoter I thought at least one would of been an uninvolved bystander. In that case Happyhexer I think that would be an excellent defense that the crew stole the money then banned together to pin it on the Covingtons. I know I’d use it if I were the lawyer it seems plausible i’d do a background check on the witnesses see if they have any criminal activity in their past.

    Also I’d want people to take a lie detector test hey if everything is on the up in up you wouldn’t mind right.

  • MissMyEm

    Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? Not crazy–sleazy promoters trying to short the talent. I have a feeling there is more to this story than meets the eye.

    That’s what the promoters did to talent at the L.A. Spring Fair. Luckily Kris got out before he played for nothing. They also absconded with all the money the fans gave them to get VIP tickets for the show because they cancelled the concert.

    I have no sympathy for the promoters and I hope Bucky can clear his name. I believe him when he says he played for free. And irony of irony…the L.A. Spring Fair was, I believe also related to Nascar so it could have been the same promoters.

  • Listening

    I have sympathy for anyone who gets stolen from a deal is a deal and if you made a bad deal w/ a promoter that’s on you. You’re trying to make money they’re trying to make money what makes one person better than another. Also I don’t like blanket statements if one promoter is dirty and lying doesn’t mean all promoters are dirty and liars.

    I think Bucky thought he was supposed to get paid not that he intended to do the concert for free. I’m guessing maybe at the last minute he was told something like oh no we’re not paying you and Bucky still performed for the fans that had come out to see him.

    I don’t know what’s going on but someone is lying either the promoter’s crew or Bucky’s crew. It just seems so elaborate though like why would the promoter’s crew have a beef w/ Bucky. Why have Bucky involved at all in a round about why saying he told his family members to take it. If you had a beef w/ Bucky and you were going to set him up simply say he did it directly. This whole thing is messed up and I don’t know which way it’s going to go. But I think this one is going the distance i’m talking court time people.

  • steph6449

    The promoter’s staff could have made it up but $1500 is really not a lot of money for four people to try and steal, much less write out false statements to the police, possibly perjure themselves in court…

    Idk, very odd situation. The detail that allegedly Bucky’s crew were selling tickets at the gate for cash and keeping the cash feels somewhat credible to me, why say that if you are making up a story you want to stick? It’s pretty easily disproven if it’s not the case. And if it is the case, it may be pretty easy to prove especially if there was any kind of video surveillance around.

    For now I’m still sticking with my dispute followed by reckless actions that led to police complaint that should be settled out of court and go away theory :)

  • http://twitter.com/cara_lee pj

    It’s hard to believe Bucky would be so hard up that he’d risk so much trying to steal $1500. I’ll choose to believe him until there’s evidence to the contrary. *shrugs*

  • happyhexer

    The detail that allegedly Bucky’s crew were selling tickets at the gate for cash and keeping the cash feels somewhat credible to me

    Let’s say you have an outsider who can attest that a crew member was selling tickets. That does not translate to stealing or an intent to steal, even if they weren’t supposed to be involved with ticket sales. I imagine the scene was chaotic, with the promoter trundled off to the hospital, and the crew member(s) may have been trying to help out. I’ve certainly seen weirder things that turned out to be innocuous.

    But I think it is more likely that the employees weren’t sure what to do in the promoter’s absence, and weren’t going to pay Bucky anything, so a fee dispute arose. I would pay close attention to what Bucky and the Covington camp say, whether there are internal inconsistencies in their statements, and how their story matches up with the story given to the police.

    Bucky mentions that he did not get paid, which makes me suspect a fee dispute, or why mention that fact?

  • steph6449

    I imagine the scene was chaotic, with the promoter trundled off to the hospital, and the crew member(s) may have been trying to help out.

    As described, it is represented that they were told not to do it and did it anyway, and that they held onto the cash they collected. It was only the promoter who was taken off, his employees who were dealing with the public seem to have still been at their posts.

    Bucky mentions that he did not get paid, which makes me suspect a fee dispute, or why mention that fact?

    I definitely think there is a high possibility of some sort of dispute before any of this happened. But as far as Bucky “not being paid” I’m not sure what’s customary.

    If anyone knows, should he have expected to be paid upfront before the concert starts? Or would it be customary to pay him afterward? If he was supposed to be paid after the performance, idk. If I thought (rightly or wrongly) that someone had stolen from my business and I was upset enough to file a police report for theft, I’m not sure I would be feeling like paying them their contractual fee when the ill-gotten proceeds of the theft would still be in their pocket.

  • Kirsten

    Idk, very odd situation. The detail that allegedly Bucky’s crew were selling tickets at the gate for cash and keeping the cash feels somewhat credible to me, why say that if you are making up a story you want to stick? It’s pretty easily disproven if it’s not the case.

    As any Prolog programmer can tell you, it’s very difficult to prove a negative. Even if everybody says that they didn’t buy a ticket from you, the other side can claim there is some mysterious missing person that did. That is why the prosecution has to prove you did it and you do not have to prove you did not.

    I really think it is some kind of contract dispute. Why did the promoter take two weeks to report this? And what goofball filled out half the forms saying it was June 14th? What, is this like Minority Report where the crime was reported two weeks before it happened?

  • happyhexer

    As described, it is represented that they were told not to do it and did it anyway, and that they held onto the cash they collected. It was only the promoter who was taken off, his employees who were dealing with the public seem to have still been at their posts.

    Yes, I am aware that the employees were still there, and that there is a claim that they were pocketing the money.

    My only point is that it is possible to add a “true” detail (if the crew were selling tickets) and later put a spin on it to give a feeling of verisimilitude. Even if the crew literally pocketed the money, it doesn’t mean they weren’t planning to account for it later. Now, if there is a disinterested party who heard the employees tell the crew not to sell the tickets (and they continued to do so) and/or challenged them about pocketing the money, you’d have a stronger case.

    Again, I’m not saying that the ticket-selling detail doesn’t raise red flags, along the theory of “why add that detail since it might be possible to disprove?” But it could be a detail that is literally true and still innocuous.

  • http://mjsbigblog.com/luvadamlamberts-american-idol-tour-2009-washington-dc-re-cap.htm luvadamlambert

    I try to see the best in ppl so I believe him

  • happyhexer

    I try to see the best in ppl so I believe him

    That’s a good way to go, iluvadamlambert. I don’t know what the truth is. But I do know that an accusation is not the same thing as a conviction. People in our legal system are supposed to be presumed innocent until proven guilty.